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Harvesting Long Island Rainwater is a Good Thing

According to statistics the average homeowner uses approximately 3,000 gallons of water weekly with about 70% used outdoors. 

“However, because typically, many locations on the East Coast, including Long Island, get plenty of rain, we have traditionally not worried about such numbers,” says Dave Stockwell. “But with climate concerns on the rise, opting to harvest rainfall for non-ingestive purposes seems much wiser than unnecessarily pulling precious water from local aquifers.”

 

Water Will Not Soak into Asphalt and Concrete

Water Will Not Soak into Asphalt and Concrete

 

Dave adds there are other benefits to capturing rainwater beyond using less water from our aquifers.

“We have a good deal of asphalt and concrete on Long Island. Rainwater does not soak into these materials. It flows away, picking up contaminants as it goes. This contaminated water ends up in our over-burdened sewer systems and eventually gets into our area waterways.”

 

 

 

 

Keeping Rain Where It Falls

Rain Barrel

Rain Barrel

Harvesting rainwater is not a new idea. People have been collecting it for generations, frequently storing it in rain barrels.

And this is still a viable method. But there’s a lot more that can be done with falling rain than saving small amounts in unattractive above-ground containers. Through our Rainwater Harvesting Group, Deck and Patio, for example, specializes in installing rainwater harvesting systems that can be part of a complete self-sustaining beautiful eco-system.

Properly captured, filtered and recirculated rainwater — in sufficient amounts to supply attractive water features — work together with carefully chosen plants, fish, rocks and gravel, to maintain a balanced system for long-term sustainability.

 

Capture Rainwater for Lawn Irrigation

Uses for Captured Rainwater

Using Aquascape’s Rainwater Harvesting System (previously branded RainXchange), and sometimes permeable pavers or roof runoff spouts, today’s rainwater harvesting systems capture sufficient rainwater to irrigate your garden and lawn, maintain any water feature, and also wash your car and/or hose down your deck and patio. 

“And when you consider that local Long island water companies frequently charge an incremental rate based on the amount of water used, capturing all the non-ingestive water you need from rainfall, the lower your rate will be,” adds Dave.

 

 

Harvested Rainwater Maintains Water Feature

Harvested Rainwater Maintains Water Feature

This Deck and Patio water feature includes a stream and multiple waterfalls — all recirculated through the same Aquascape Rainwater Harvesting water collection system. City water is not used. Such a feature attracts desirable wildlife including frogs, butterflies, birds etc. and naturally creates its own wildlife refuge.

 

Rainwater Part of Healthy Ecosystem:

Rainwater Part of Healthy Ecosystem:

Along with waterfalls, stream and pond, for a healthy ecosystem, it is essential to choose the right stones and gravel (which provide the correct ph value for the fish and plants). A beautiful Japanese maple shades this pondscape’s bridge; bright red geraniums add a strong burst of color (photo’s bottom right).

 

Permeable Pavers

Permeable Pavers

These pavers are fitted over gravel and a rubber liner is another way to harvest rainwater. They allow easy walking while capturing and filtering rainwater for reuse. The gravel underneath the pavers filters the collected water runoff before it is sent to any reservoir installed at the end of a stream/water feature.

Deck and Patio specializes in installing systems that capture, filter, and recirculate rainwater, in sufficient amounts to use in your yard for non-ingestive purposes, as well as  supply and keep topped off healthy water features.

 

Help the Declining Bird Population While Brightening Up Your Winter Yard

Long Islanders, including many Deck and Patio clients, are strong environmentalists and nature lovers. And they are well aware of recent news reports that North America has lost 3 billion birds since 1970. 

What may be news to some is that not all the loss has been among rare birds. One in four colorful blue jays, for example, have been lost, and we recommend a SC Times post that includes some great tips on a variety of ways we all can help.

News has not been all bad though. Because of conservation efforts, populations of waterfowl have increased in recent decades. However, even with the increase in waterfowl, the overall loss in birds does tug on the conscience. 

Inviting Birds to Your Property

We may not have any snowy owls to protect, on Long island, but we can provide a safe habitat for lots of delightful birds — and birds of glorious color that can brighten our winter season.

 

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

Peanut Wreath

Peanut Wreath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Jays, who do need help, are colorful birds that by nature are happy to stay around in winter. These avian friends love to congregate in groups come winter. They also will squirrel food away. Some have witnessed Blue Jays hiding nuts in trees.

We spoke with Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant at the Cornell Cooperative Extension in Riverhead about attracting the Jays.

 “If you want to help Blue Jays, they really like nuts and peanuts. I use a peanut wreath and fill it with shelled peanuts. This type of feeder attracts a lot of Blue Jays.”

They are also such fun to watch — not to mention they add a lot of color against a winter  landscape.”

 

Cardinals

Cardinals

Cardinals

Consider how the bright red plumage of the Cardinal could cheer the dreariest of days while you’re helping to save birds overall. The male’s full-bodied red actually gets more striking during winter. This is when some of their remaining gray-tipped feathers fall off, showing even more vibrant red.

What a picture they make resting on icy branches and snow. “If you want to attract them, Cardinals love black oil sunflower and safflower seeds,” says Vultaggio.

It’s helpful to note that Cardinals usually eat early in the morning or late in the evening so make sure feeders are well stocked at these times. Also, being a larger bird, they prefer a larger feeder that won’t sway too much as they eat.

 

Chickadees

Chickadees

Chickadees

Chickadees prefer the same type of seeds as the Cardinal: black oil sunflower and safflower.

Vultaggio is also delighted by their sounds: “They actually say chickadee when they sing.”

Chickadees are vibrant even though, as part of the Titmouse family, they are known for their gray color and lighter bellies.

“They dine primarily on insects, seeds and berries,” adds Vultaggio.

“They are active and agile little birds. These little acrobats are a delight to watch when they hang upside down from twigs or at your feeder.

 

Extra Tips

1.  Vulraggio also puts out suet in winter, which she says attracts other birds including woodpeckers.

2.  Bird Baths are a great help to birds in winter 

3.  Put up bird houses designed for specific birds

 

 

Bird Baths:

Bird Baths:

A bird bath is important. Water is often scarce in the dead of winter.

Of course, you don’t want the water to ice up and there are lots of bird bath heaters, including solar heated bird baths.

Pictured immediately above is a Heated Deck-Mounted Birdbath by Allied Precision. “You’ll also find that in winter birds tend to appear in groups since many eyes make it safer to watch out for predators.” 

 

Upscale Birdhouses:

Upscale Birdhouses:

Granted, wild birds may not exactly be pets. But it’s trendy to treat them like they are. So it’s not surprising that fancy bird houses are growing in popularity. Indeed, there are even awards for the best design in bird houses.

The point is, a bird house can be a reflection of your own style and tastes and certainly can be upscale, all while you’re aiding in bird conservation. Besides, if our avian friends are going to sing for their supper, they might as well be housed as nicely as we are. 

It’s worth checking to learn what the birds you’re trying to attract require. For example, Blue Jays like to nest at least 10 feet off the ground so your birdhouse should be at least that high in a tree or pole. They like to use tree roots and small thin sticks to create a nest so you can place them nearby along with the food they prefer. 

 

Birds are, indeed, such a wonderful way to add color to your winter garden. And it feels great to know you are helping in a very small way to reverse the trends of bird loss on our continent. 

Note: Our feature photo at the top of the page is of a tit bird feeding on a tit ring. 

By |2019-11-08T16:28:33-05:00November 7th, 2019|Backyard Escapes, Environment Issues, Landscaping, Seasonal Landscapes|Comments Off on Help the Declining Bird Population While Brightening Up Your Winter Yard