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Gardening Trends: Planting Your Garden by Phases of the Moon

The last super moon of 2019 — often called the worm moon, or the last full moon of winter — has been regaling us this week — and last night’s was a stunner! What a way to say good-bye to winter and welcome spring. The timing of the worm moon’s light show helps underscore an emerging trend in gardening.

Planting by Phases of the Moon

Planting by Phases of the Moon

Planting by the Moon

According to such notable organizations as Better Homes and Gardens (BH&G), planting by the moon’s phases is a trend that may allow us to grow healthier, stronger and more fruitful plants.

To help us think this interesting BG&H post through, Deck and Patio has been in touch with a local horticulture consultant. Below, Sandra Vultaggio from Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Here’s her response:

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

“I do not know much on the topic of lunar planting, but know of some folklore associated with it. That said, all of what I read in that article sounds plausible. I have also heard that you can time crops by the moon phases. For instance, you can begin planting summer crops outdoors after the last full moon of May. The truth behind this is typically on a full moon, cloudless night, you’ll have the greatest chance of having a frost. And by that time, here on Long island, you’re probably safe from frosts.

Does Moonlight Stimulate Leaf and Stem Growth?

Does Moonlight Stimulate Leaf and Stem Growth?

“They also say to plant all of your above-ground-fruiting crops (plants like tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, etc, as well as your flowering annuals) during the waxing moon. Meaning, the time that the moon is growing fuller. The theory suggests that as the light from the moon increases each night, plants are stimulated to produce leaves and stems.”

“On the flip side, plant your below-ground-fruiting crops (carrots, potatoes, onions, as well as trees, shrubs and annuals) during the waning moon. Meaning, the time that the moon is getting smaller. As the amount of over-night light decreases, plants are stimulated to produce roots and tubers.

 

Candidum Lily Blooms in Spring

Candidum Lily Blooms in Spring

“Whether all this is true or not, I do not know. But, like I said, it is very plausible! Our ancestors, old farmers and gardeners, who depended on their gardens and crops for their lives, did not look at a paper calendar to determine planting times. 

They observed their surroundings. Everything from precipitation events, wind direction, moon phases, the arrival of certain wildlife or the bloom-time of certain flowers, all played a part in the decisions on their land. These practices are held scared by some families, as they should. They are invaluable lessons that have been passed down generation to generation.”

— Sandra Vultaggio

 

Planting Moonflowers in the Northeast:

Planting Moonflowers in the Northeast:

If you’re thinking of planting annuals by phases of the moon, Moonflowers might be fun. This gorgeous flower is usually seen in more tropical regions than the Northeast — as a perennial. But even with our winters, they have been successfully grown up in our neck of the woods as an “annual.”

 

Dahlias Make Beautiful Blooms:

Dahlias Make Beautiful Blooms:

These are definitely stunning annuals that can be dug up and stored in winter and can be grown in the northeast despite being tropical plants. Just plant them in spring and treat them as annuals. They have a long bloom period. 

Planting by the moon's phases

Planting by the moon’s phases

So if you’ve had a chance to enjoy this week’s salute to spring in the sky — the worm moon — take note of its message. The ground is warming up enough for worms to come to the surface — and planting time is here. 

If you decide to plant flowers or crops via the moon’s phases, let us know how it went.

Happy spring!

 

 

By |2019-03-21T13:41:57-05:00March 21st, 2019|Ask the Experts, Gardening, Herb/Vegetable Gardens, Landscaping, Seasonal Landscapes, Unique Ideas, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Gardening Trends: Planting Your Garden by Phases of the Moon

Water Features for Public Spaces, Parks, and Town Centers

In ancient days, water fountains were a source of drinking and wash water for local citizens. Today, cities and towns across the globe add water features to parks and town centers mainly for the beauty and tranquility they bring.

However. Whether the water feature is a fountain, water wall, waterfall, stream, or pond, it is widely accepted today that any such feature be ‘green.’

Such was the case when Deck and Patio, in collaboration with the Town of Huntington, designed/built a self-sustaining or green waterfall/water garden at one of the busiest spots in the area: the Huntington Train Station.

As background: For some time Deck and Patio has operated a sustainable division, our Rainwater Harvesting Group. 

“Rainwater harvesting is just what it sounds like,” says Dave Stockwell. “It’s a green method of capturing rainwater which can be used at private residences as well as in pubic spaces.”

At one’s home, adds Dave, captured rainwater is used for tasks that don’t require treated water such as washing a deck, lawn watering, washing vehicles, and refreshing one’s garden.”

In public spaces, it can be a source for sustaining not only the beautiful relaxing water feature itself, but there, too, the surrounding garden spots and plantings can be watered as well. 

How did the train station project come about?

Huntington Train Station Project

Huntington Train Station Project

The train station is just a few blocks from Deck and Patio’s design center at 189 Broadway.

One day a member of our team was engaged in a casual conversation with a few women planting flowers near the station.

As a local landscaper, we offered to help by adding plants, flowers, shrubs and moss rocks.

 

Station Area As Deck and Patio Began Work

Station Area As Deck and Patio Began Work

“A problem became immediately apparent,” says Dave. “There wasn’t any water source for maintaining the plants. The women had been lugging five-gallon buckets of water from their condos to maintain them.

“In addition, there was no walkway in this space, beyond a small brick and cement sidewalk. There was only a dirt path. It was also not handicap accessible and it seemed like the spot needed more than just plants and shrubs.”

After consulting with our Rainwater Harvesting Group, we approached the Town of Huntington. “They were completely on board,” says Dave. “Huntington Township takes great care to beautify our public spaces, including healthy and cheerful pole planters, etc.”

With the Town’s cooperation, Deck and Patio installed the self-sustaining water feature with an underground reservoir to store captured rainwater. To help accumulate the most rainfall, as well as add a paver pathway for direct access from the curb to the parking lot, we constructed a walk area made of permeable paves.

“We used Techo-Bloc permeable pavers and installed them over gravel and a rubber liner.,” says Dave. “These pavers allow the rainwater to seep into the ground and into the reservoir where it can be recirculated.

“The gravel and liner filter the water runoff before it is sent, using gravity alone, to the reservoir,” adds Dave. The system we used was known then Aquascape RainXchange Harvesting System which is now called “Aquascape’s Rainwater Harvesting System.”

“There is enough captured water to not only sustain the water feature, but to also irrigate all the plantings,” says Dave. “Plus, this eco-friendly system keeps falling non-filtered rainwater from going into the Town’s sewer system and on into Huntington Bay.”

 

Water Feature (Huntington Train Station/NY)

Water Feature (Huntington Train Station/NY)

The water feature is not just for aesthetics. It is highly functional. Its waterfall aerates the water — or oxygenates it. The water plants we added absorb nutrients and pollutants to help purify the water. All together, the gravel, liner, and plants create a self-sustaining rainwater harvesting garden. The area is now a magnet for local birds who come here to bathe and drink.

 

Rainwater Harvesting System (Huntington Train Station/NY)

Rainwater Harvesting System (Huntington Train Station/NY):

The Aquascape Rainwater Harvesting System includes an auxiliary pump connected to the irrigation system. This ensures that the water used isn’t city water, but harvested entirely from rainwater. The below ground Aquascape Aqua Blox Reservoir holds 500 gallons of rainwater.

 

Sustainable Water Feature (Huntington Train Station/NY):

Sustainable Water Feature (Huntington Train Station/NY):

The water feature at the train station (which is, alas, as of this writing buried under snow and ice!) is in total keeping with the Town’s program of beautification of public spaces.

 

Rainwater Harvesting at Huntington Station NY

Rainwater Harvesting at Huntington Station NY

Where once was only a dirt path from the sidewalk to the train parking lot, permeable pavers allow easy walking (arrow area pavers) while capturing and filtering rainwater for reuse. The pavers used are Techo-Bloc Victorien Permeable Pavers.

 

 

Landscaping with Pantone’s 2019 Color of the Year: “Living Coral”

In Pennsylvania recently, the legendary groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, predicted an early spring. And we thought fellow gardeners and outdoor living aficionados would find this to be a great time to plan summer gardens and landscapes.

At Deck and Patio, we frequently get requests for plants in the latest popular colors, including Pantone’s Color of the year, which for 2019 is “Living Coral.” (Our feature photo above, is from Pantone’s announcement of this year’s color.)

Pantone sees this hue as “animating and life-affirming” and we agree that Living Coral will inspire in any garden. 

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

 

To bring you some expert advice on plants that will offer that uplifting color, we spoke with our good friend, Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant at Suffolk County’s Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Diagnostic Lab, and she has some great ideas for our part of the Northeast. Her comments on plant ideas follow.

 

 

 

 

So! Let’s get planning:

Coral Drift Rose

Coral Drift Rose

 

 

Coral Drift® Rose: Bright coral-orange flowers bloom bountifully throughout the growing season. They make great container plants or planted in mass in a sunny border: see https://www.driftroses.com/collection1

 

 

 

 

Heuchera ‘Marmalade’

Heuchera ‘Marmalade’

 

 

 

Heuchera ‘Marmalade’: Beautiful coral-orange-pink Coral Bells will pop in a partially shaded garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coral Charm Peony (Photo: Waysidegardens.com)

‘Coral Charm’ Peony (Photo: Waysidegardens.com)

 

 

 

‘Coral Charm’ Peony: Add some variety to the pink and white fluffy peonies of spring with this peachy-coral peony with a bright golden center. Peonies grow well in full sun and are deer resistant.

 

 

 

 

 

Dianthus 'Coral Reef' from ILoveHostas.net

Dianthus ‘Coral Reef’ from ILoveHostas.net

 

 

 

Dianthus ‘Coral Reef’: Grassy, grey-green, evergreen mounds of foliage are topped with bright, cheery and fragrant coral-pink flowers with white edges. Begins blooming in spring and will repeat throughout the growing season. This perennial is deer resistant too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia coccinea ‘Coral Nymph’

Salvia coccinea ‘Coral Nymph’

 

Salvia coccinea ‘Coral Nymph’: Attract hummingbirds to your garden with this beautiful coral salvia. These plants are not winter hardy on Long island, but will provide summer-long blooms in full sun gardens. (Photo from: Buyrareseeds.com)

 

 

 

 

We’d like to Sandra V. For her ideas today. In addition, Deck and Patio has a few other delightful plants to suggest: the Kniphofia Red-hot Popsicle, the gorgeous Dahlia, and the Coral Rose (shown below) which also fare very well in the Northeast.

 

Kniphofia Redhot Popsicle

Kniphofia Redhot Popsicle

 

Coral Dahlia from Sun Spot catalog

Coral Dahlia from Sun Spot catalog

 

Coral Rose

The pièce de résistance: a delicate Coral Rose.

 

 

 

 

By |2019-02-07T14:01:23-05:00February 7th, 2019|Ask the Experts, Backyard Refurbishments, Backyard Upgrades, Gardening, Landscaping, Outdoor Living, outdoor maintenance, Plantings/Pondscapes, Seasonal Landscapes, Unique Ideas, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Landscaping with Pantone’s 2019 Color of the Year: “Living Coral”

Emerging Landscaping Trends for 2019 (Part II)

As promised last week, today’s blog is Part II of our focus on landscaping trends for 2019. To further inspire our outdoor living aficionados, we’re showcasing below a few more Deck and Patio projects that, according to trend spotters, are definitely in vogue.

So let’s complete our look at 2019 landscaping trends!

Curb Appeal

According to HGTV, a neatly trimmed and elegantly paved entryway never goes out of style. Of course, the design can also be stylish.

 

Landscaping Outdoor Entryways

Landscaping Outdoor Entryways

For this entryway, Deck and Patio designed the shape of flower bed cutouts and chose the hues of the plants as complements to the overall tiered paver hardscapes. Even the outdoor light pillar was done in the same paving material for a beautiful — and harmonious  — curb appeal. 

Party Spots

Creating inviting outdoor spaces is key to entertaining, says HGTV.

 

Outdoor Entertaining

Outdoor Entertaining

“Constructing outdoor living spaces ideal for entertaining is at the core of Deck and Patio’s work,” says our own Dave Stockwell. “For the project shown here, we added a pergola over an outdoor bar equipped with two sheet-falling waterfalls. The pergola provides shade for the bar, ideal during the heat of summer. Plus the sounds of falling water encourages relaxed conversation. 

“We also added large shade umbrellas over the client’s new portable hot tub and lounge areas for great pool-side shade and ambience. Anywhere you go on this patio,” says Dave, “it’s inviting for guests.” 

Fountains and Flowers

Adding the sound of water is a huge trend in landscaping. 

Garden Fountains

Garden Fountains

Since fountains come in all sizes there is a right one for just about any outdoor space. Consider this Aquasacpe Inc. fountain that is not only a treat for the senses when the clients are outdoors, it was placed close to a window so they can appreciate it from inside as well. 

Garden Rooms that Bloom

One landscaping trend that continually grows and grows in popularity is the private outdoor escape. 

Beautiful Garden Rooms

Beautiful Garden Rooms

For these clients, the “garden” serves several purposes. Planted directly into the slope, supported by massive rock steps, it becomes part of a lovely “natural” retaining wall. 

The upper patio area is surrounded by lush greenery, bright plantings and a tranquil waterfall. Whether one escapes here to read a book, meditate, or just relax and listen to the sounds of flowing water and chirping birds, there’s a reason garden rooms are a popular landscaping trend.

Inviting Landscaping

Well designed landscapes are inviting as a place to refresh to soul.

Landscape Havens

Landscape Havens

Lush landscapes aren’t just havens for humans. A bit of lavender, for example, is one example of flora that will draw butterflies. And a bird bath (see feature photo at top of page) won’t just be a rest for your avian friends. Other amusing critters can’t resist a nice spot for refreshment. 

 

 

Landscaping Trends for 2019

Are you yearning for a bit of outdoor whimsy like attaching a swing to your pergola? Or perhaps you’re hungering for backyard woodland garden design? Maybe you’ve been asking your landscaper to come up with a stylish entryway to your home? 

If any of these fit your mood lately, you may be what the pros call a trendsetter. Because these very ideas are some of the emerging landscaping trends for 2019 according to HGTV.  

Deck and Patio was particularly delighted to note that water features continue their rise in HGTV’s landscaping trends. Ponds, streams, waterfalls, including pool water features, with picturesque viewing areas, are specialities of our firm.

 

One of three out-of-state Deck and Patio projects

One of three out-of-state Deck and Patio projects

 

“When you have passion for your work, it’s nice to know it’s shared by your community and by those in the know,” says our own Dave Stockwell. “As landscape and garden designers, we’ve built a reputation as go-to experts for water features.”

Indeed. Deck and Patio has constructed over 300 ponds and water features on Long Island alone. However, good news spreads and we’ve also been invited out-of-state to Kentucky and Tennessee to design/construct dramatic water features for special pool projects.”

 

Pool Kings HGTV Project:

Pool Kings HGTV Project:

Here is another Pool Kings project which was highlighted on one of their HGTV television episodes. The water feature project was in Tennessee — quite a distance from our usual Long Island, NY, area of operation.

 

Speaking of Whimsy

Private Island in Backyard Pond:

Private Island in Backyard Pond:

We don’t know if this qualifies as whimsical, but it definitely is unique, imaginative and totally unexpected we believe. It was a Deck and Patio design idea we suggested when building a backyard pond for clients. We added stepping stones (unseen) which go from their new patio out to the large stone island where they can escape to relax and enjoy their pond up close.

 

Beautiful Woodland Garden Paths

Woodland garden design

Woodland garden design

These Deck and Patio clients had a beautiful wooded yard with some pre-existing nature walks. They also had a bridge. We designed stone steps, streams, and waterfalls in an around the bridge, just below a comfortable park-style bench. 

In addition, we added beautiful ground cover and leafy plants. The point was to increase their enjoyment of being out in their own private refuge without disturbing the property’s natural woodland. 

Next week, our blog will highlight a few more of HGTV trends and how Deck and Patio is keeping Long Islanders (as well as those farther south) landscaped with the times.

 

 

Gardening: There’s a Fall Chill in the Air. It’s Time to Think Spring

When you can no longer sit out in the evening without a fire pit to warm you, it’s time to plan for spring. Everyone wants bright cheery flowers telling us winter is finally over. Well, such welcome beauties grow from bulbs planted in the chilly weather of fall — late October and November. 

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

To get some great planting ideas for a spring garden, we spoke with Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant at Suffolk County’s Cornel Cooperative Extension, who has some great tips on planting bulbs.

“When to Plant Spring Bulbs

Gardeners wait until the fall to plant their spring bulbs. Waiting until the soil temperature has dipped to about 55°F is ideal. Usually this corresponds to overnight air temperatures cooling to around 40 – 50°F.

 

Which Bulbs to Plant

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

Considering the deer population on Long Island, I would recommend choosing bulbs that the deer tend to avoid.

I suggest planting daffodils, allium (ornamental onion), hyacinth, grape hyacinth and crocus.

Though not actually bulbs, you can venture into some of the other tuberous perennials like peony and tall bearded iris as well.

 

 

Grape Hyacinth: These beauties can make beautiful edging to other spring flowers.

Grape Hyacinth: These beauties can make beautiful edging to other spring flowers.

 

Crocus: These beauties are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

Crocus: These beauties are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

 

Best Soils for Bulbs

Bulbs grow well  in many different soil types but the one site they won’t enjoy is heavy, poorly draining soils. Ideally you should plan to plant in soils that are organically rich, slightly acidic, well-drained sandy loams or loamy sands.

Spacing the Bulbs When Planting

As far as spacing, bulb depth and so forth, all of that information is provided as part of the growing instructions for each bulb. Planting depths even vary between varieties, depending on if you have a large “trumpet” variety, or the small ‘Tete A Tete’ varieties. Most bulbs will enjoy a sunny garden, but will usually perform well in a partially sunny garden as well.

Should You Compost

Compost is not necessary to layer on top. If you feel your soil is lacking organic matter, you will be better off incorporating compost into the top 6” of soil before planting. Mix bonemeal or superphosphate with the soil at the bottom of the planting hole, or incorporate it into the soil around each bulb’s planting hole.

What Tools Will You Need

As far as tools go, to make the job easiest is to buy a bulb planter. This is a metal garden gadget that you stick in the ground, pull it up and out comes a cylinder of soil. Place the bulb, right-side up into the hole, and cover back up with soil. If you don’t have a bulb planter, and garden trowel will do just fine. Short on time? Dig larger holes and place a few bulbs in each hole so the flowers come up in clumps.”

Ms. Vultaggio’s Spring Garden: ‘Tete a tete’ daffodils brighten the horticulturist’s spring yard.

Ms. Vultaggio’s Spring Garden:
‘Tete a tete’ daffodils brighten the horticulturist’s spring yard.

 

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

Note from Deck and Patio: Ms. Vultaggio’s comment on Audrey Hepburn reminds us that one of the episodes on the actress’s series on world gardens covered tulips and spring bulbs. 

These beauties are some of the first heralds that spring has arrived. It’s no wonder that Ms. Hepburn and the producers of “Gardens of the World..” chose them as a focus of an episode — and that they are one of the horticulturist’s suggested bulbs.

Our thanks to Sandra Vultaggio for her helpful spring gardening ideas. The weather, by the way, is perfect on Long Island right now  to start thinking of spring! Happy Planting!

 

 

Fall Outdoor Season: Color It Autumn

Many of us in the northeast retreat very reluctantly to a winter spent indoors. We make every effort to extend the outdoor season with the addition of fire pits, outdoor fireplaces, hot tubs, some even adding a four-season room.

4-Season Room

4-Season Room

Outdoor Fireplace

Outdoor Fireplace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So its natural that when we see the first leaf turn from green to crimson high in a backyard tree, we know we’re heading into the last outdoor living sprint. The subject today is: how can we make this precious outdoor living time richly colorful for the maximum enjoyment?

Outdoor Displays

One way to make the outdoors inviting is by displaying some of fall’s bounty: gorgeous plants, fruits, vegetables and even berries — all perfect for decorating yards and front door entries.

“Annuals provide color when certain plants are no longer in bloom,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell.  “Great color producers for fall that last well into several frosts before dying back to the ground include kale, cabbage, decorative peppers, mums, cyclamen, etc.”

It’s also important to add compost to these plants so they get plenty of food while they are blooming, says Dave. 

“Cold hardy mums, for example, require water every other day as they have copious flowers and use up a lot of energy and will require additional watering if there’s isn’t sufficient rainfall. But what a cheerful display these fruits and plants offer.”

 

Outdoor Decorating for Fall:

Outdoor Decorating for Fall:

Believe it or not, the pumpkin is not a vegetable — it’s a fruit, and a berry at that. Along with hardy mums in bright yellow, etc., at Deck and Patio’s design center in Huntington Station we love displaying lots of these fall ‘berries’ for pops of bright orange.

 

Grouping Fall Plants:

Grouping Fall Plants:

 

 

For different texture and color, it’s a good idea to create a grouping of fall plants. This nice grouping includes cabbage, deep red mums, and winter pansies for a bright, bold statement. (Photo: Hicks Nurseries)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ornamental Peppers

Ornamental Peppers

Aren’t these ornamental peppers beauties! Grown for their decorative value (although edible, they are rather lacking in flavor) as are the leaves and flowers of the deep red Celosia Cristata (aka cockscomb) behind them.  (Photo: Hicks Nurseries)

 

Planning Ahead for Fall Color

Fall can be a great time to plant color for future autumn glory. Here’s two great ideas:

 

Rosehips:

Rosehips:

Rosehips come from plants also known as Autumn Wild Rose. They can enhance any autumn landscape. Note: Since they can take three years to grow from seeds, you’ll probably want to transplant a grown bush. This is done during the dormant season — sometime between November through February.

This beautiful plant is a wildflower with bright red fruit hips that ripen in fall — and stay around through winter. The rose hips grow as the petals of the summer flowers drop off. These hips contain the seeds of the rose. Prune the bushes down to the ground in winter and then wait. When the temperature warms again in spring, they begin to regrow. By summer, you have wild roses, and in fall, you get the rose hips again.

 

Sumac:

Sumac:

When we recommend a great plant for fall color, we emphasize ones that are interesting throughout the year. With Sumac shrubs and trees, their displays begin with large flower clusters in spring, gorgeously colored fall foliage (as seen here) with berries that can last into winter. 

Any well-drained soil works for this adaptable plant. It can take full sun or partial shade. Note: for the most dramatic fall colors, the flame leaf or prairie sumac have the best flowers and color when planted in full sun.  

 

Even City Life Can Boast a Backyard Refuge

Whether it’s the long Labor Day holiday weekend created for workers, or simply the few scattered hours you squeeze out of a relentless workweek, it’s nice to enjoy some free time in blissful leisure at home.

Location, Location, Location

However, what if your property isn’t located in a pastoral area that allows for inviting quiet time? What if your locality is all hustle-bustle? Such was the case for these Deck and Patio clients. Their home is tightly surrounded by apartment buildings, traffic and noise — in the very heart of Queens, a teaming borough of New York City.

In this atmosphere, even adding a pool and patio wouldn’t provide the escape the homeowners desired. To create for them a real backyard oasis, we had to block out the noise and oppressive atmosphere.

Solutions, Solutions, Solutions

One of the best ways to screen out noise is a sizable waterfall and the clients opted for one to provide splashing sounds into their new pool. In addition, our clients asked us to build a 12-foot-high concrete block wall. While useful as a noise and environs barrier, a wall can be a bit oppressive in itself.

So the next challenge was to soften the wall’s appearance. First, we planted bamboo around its perimeter. Bamboo can be invasive so we encased the woody grass with concrete blocks to limit its spreading.

Special Feature

One thing great about interior and exterior walls is they make an ideal canvas. Taking full advantage of the wall, Deck and Patio designed and supervised the layout of a “living wall” that can hold multiple-sized pots for plants. When completed, the living wall became living art — changing in color and shape almost daily. (For details on living wall – see photos 5, 6, below.)

 The result: the clients may live in a busy part of New York City, but their Labor Days — and every spare moment they can muster— will be spent in blissful leisure right in their own backyard.

 

Backyard Noise Barriers (Queens/NY):

Backyard Noise Barriers (Queens/NY):

Water cascading over rock into another water pool is a natural sound barrier that is peaceful and soothing to the soul. 

 

Backyard Refuge (Queens/NY):

Backyard Refuge (Queens/NY):

The sounds of the waterfalls, the colorful landscaping and the dramatic concrete block wall together give a sense of refuge in this bustling part of one of America’s five largest cities.

 

Pool Waterfalls (Queens/NY):

Pool Waterfalls (Queens/NY):

The free-form vinyl-liner pool includes boulder coping, and a moss rock waterfall with robust plantings that help beautify the wall. 

 

Techo-Bloc Patios (Queens/NY):

Techo-Bloc Patios (Queens/NY):

The pool’s surrounding patio is made from Techo-Bloc pavers that handsomely complement the 12-foot-high wall and smaller concrete encasement for the bamboo.

 

'Plug n Play’ Living Walls (Queens/NY):

‘Plug n Play’ Living Walls (Queens/NY):

“There are many types of Living Walls; interior and exterior, permanent or seasonal walls, and then there is the ‘Plug n Play’ (manufactured and trademarked by Green Living Technologies, International or GLTi) that we used here.

 

'Plug n Play’ Living Walls (Queens/NY):

‘Plug n Play’ Living Walls (Queens/NY):

The Plug n Play is very versatile and can be manufactured to accept multiple-sized pots (3” to 12″). Drip irrigation is set up on alternating rows and trickles down to each row below; excess water is either captured or drains. Plants are set on an angle with their holes faced downward so the roots/soil can sap up water via wicking effect. These units can be fastened to any type of wall; using the right type of fastener for each respective wall type.

 

Recipe for a Delightful Garden: Just Add Water!

Just add flowing water, that is!

As garden designers and landscapers, we know flower beds take thought. Color, textures, soil, how much sun or shade, etc. But there’s one easy garden complement that makes any flower bed transformative in how it delights the soul. Even small gardens become something wonderful when the sights and sounds of flowing water are added.

Those who know Deck and Patio for our larger pond/water feature installations (we’ve done over 300 on Long Island alone) may be surprised that we also specialize in smaller water features such as fountains.

Why Are Garden Water Features So Desirable?

First. By bringing the sounds of nature as close as your doorstep, flowing water immediately makes any garden feel more like a part of the natural landscape. 

Second. Not only will you enjoy the sights and sounds of water, but butterflies and birds, and other desirable critters will appreciate your efforts. It feels really good to know you’re supporting such lovable wildlife — and you get to watch them as they take advantage of it. 

Third. A fountain can fit just about anywhere. No need to plan or find room for an elaborate pondscape or another expansive water feature. A fountain (which comes in all sizes) can be added just about anywhere — although we recommend installing it where you can enjoy it from both your patio and inside your home. (More on that below.)

Fourth. A water fountain can run most of the year — including winter. Even when your fall plantings are gone to seed, so to speak, you’ll have something beautiful to look at.

 

Stacked Stone Urn fountain

Stacked Stone Urn fountain

This photo is one such garden fountain that we added for clients who had recently moved to a new home. (This fountain is also seen above as our feature photo) 

When working at their property, one of our team members mentioned that it felt like the garden was missing something — a feature that would offer both the sound and relaxing sight of water movement. 

The clients agreed that a garden fountain would be an ideal finishing touch in such limited space.

 

And here’s a 5-second video for you to hear the water music of that installation:  

 

 

DIY Fountain Projects

If you’d like to add one of these fountains on your own, all you need is a shovel, a wheelbarrow and a level. 

Then, adding a bag of decorative gravel and mulch, you have a picture-perfect-and-sound-perfect-fountain that not only you will enjoy but so will many of Nature’s lovable wildlife.

Here is a step-by-step DIY video from Aquascape, followed by a link to the various fountains they have available. You can contact them directly — or give us a call to help you make the right choice for your garden, and also install it for you, if you would rather not do it yourself.

 

  

And for a video of the various fountains available from Aquascape or Deck and Patio:

 

 

 

How To Keep Pond Fish Safe from Other Creatures

First, Pond Fish Are A Good Thing!

When a pond water feature is well-designed-and-built, koi will naturally help balance the entire pond ecosystem.

However, many pond owners fear that the fish will be harmed or will not survive.

Keeping Koi Safe

Keeping Koi Safe

 

 

And while it is true that koi can be tempting to cats, raccoons, and herons, etc., there are precautions that will mitigate their attempts to reach your pond fish.

 

 

 

 

 

Adding Rock Overhangs

Adding Rock Overhangs

 

Adding koi castles and tunnels at the bottom of the pond will give fish a safe place to hide from many predators.

Include rock overhangs around the outside of the pond. This will, first and foremost, make any pond appear more natural while discouraging cats and raccoons from reaching into the water after the fish.

 

 

 

 

Pond Water Depth is Key

Pond Water Depth is Key

Planning a water feature with sufficient water depth can also dissuade raccoons and cats further, since neither enjoy swimming to get their dinner.

Plus deeper water at the edges (more than 18” deep) discourages heron wading.

Another helpful idea is adding a waterfall feature. The continuous movement of its water, or even water from nearby sprinklers, will put off many avian predators.

 

 

Herons do not like deep water

Herons, for example, do not like deep water.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of the Laidback Gardener.

Photo Courtesy of the Laidback Gardener.

Other precautions koi pond owners can take is installing scarecrows, such as owl statues. A net will also work, but most pond owners prefer to limit net use to fall foliage season.

However, one particularly effective deterrent Deck and Patio has found is installing a motion-activated sprinkler.

Indeed, one gardening expert, the Laidback Gardener, agrees. After testing just about every animal repellent conceivable, he wrote in his blog last year:

“…the only simple deterrent that keeps most animals away in the long run is the motion-activated sprinkler.”

—Larry Hodgson, the Laidback Gardener

 

 

Art Courtesy: the Laidback Gardener

Art is Courtesy of the Laidback Gardener

“At Deck and Patio, we believe that if you build your pond well, and install a motion-activated sprinkler, there really is no reason not to add koi to your pond,” says Dave Stockwell.

“And when using a motion-activated sprinkler, you might find it will drive unwanted animals away from your garden as well.”

 

 

 

Koi is a healthy part of this pond’s natural ecosystem; they have lots of room to hide as well as swim. The pond is sufficiently deep, including around the edges. There are also plenty of rock overhangs to discourage predators. Add a motion-activated sprinkler for the final bit of security, and you and there’s no reason to fear for your koi.

Koi is a healthy part of this pond’s natural ecosystem; they have lots of room to hide as well as swim. The pond is sufficiently deep, including around the edges. There are also plenty of rock overhangs to discourage predators. Add a motion-activated sprinkler for the final bit of security, and you and there’s no reason to fear for your koi.

 

The feature photo at the top of today’s blog is artwork courtesy of the Laidback Gardener, Larry Hodgson.

 

 

 

 

 

By |2018-05-31T13:30:00-05:00May 31st, 2018|Gardening, Koi Ponds, Living Landscapes, Moss Rock and Stones, Outdoor Living, Plantings/Pondscapes, Ponds & Water Features, Pool Waterfalls|Comments Off on How To Keep Pond Fish Safe from Other Creatures