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Pond Maintenance Tips for Fall

 

Netting Ponds in Fall.

Netting Ponds in Fall.

 

 

Our blog a few weeks ago reminded pond lovers to net their pond before the leaves fall. And after you’ve captured them by the net, you can simply pull it out and once again enjoy your pond unobstructed.

But what’s required once the leaves have fallen?

 

 

 

Aquatic Plants Maintenance

 

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

“After all the leaves have fallen, this is the right time to trim back and remove any dead foliage from aquatic plants,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell. “This helps remove excessive organic material that would otherwise decompose in your water feature. Such decaying material can cause excess gasses and undesirable algae.”

Pond lilies, like you see in this Deck and Patio pond photo, are idyllic water plants for a variety of reasons. But they tend to need a little maintenance in fall. It’s a good idea to cut them back to just about the base of the plant; also trim back any marginal plants that might eventually droop over into the water.

 

 

 

 

Chemical Pond Treatments

 

Leaves In Backyard Stream 

Leaves In Backyard Stream

 

 

 

Even with great care, you’ll find that some leaves/debris make it into your pond. Dave Kelly of Aquasacpe Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).

Kelly recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.  (Photo: Aquascape Inc.)

 

 

 

 

Caring for Pond Fish

 

You can — and should — plump up your koi darlings to survive winter hibernation. As temperatures start to drop, gradually increase how much you feed them. When your pond’s water gets below 59 degrees, we recommend using fish food made for cold water. 

Note: As the temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them. Once water temperatures go below 55 degrees, says Kelly, the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. 

And when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

 

Pond Fish in Fall:

Pond Fish in Fall:

There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. However, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely

 

Healthy Ponds:

Healthy Ponds:

Once Spring arrives, and your pond and fish are healthy and thriving, you’ll be glad you took such good care of your pond in the Fall.

 

There! That’s not so bad, is it. Just remember: a little fall maintenance makes all the difference.

 

Fall Planting Is for All Seasons

As Ms. Hepburn said, a garden is truly to believe in tomorrow — a happy tomorrow full of color. 

And there’s no better time than now to begin exercising that belief. Late fall is the perfect time to plant bulbs. 

When the temperature in fall has dropped to about 55 degrees F and the overnight drops to between 40 and 50, this is the ideal time to plant bulbs for spring.

So let’s get to which plants thrive and grow best in our neck of the woods.

 

Which Bulbs to Plant in Fall

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

 

“We have a considerable deer population on Long Island,” says our own Dave Stockwell. “And we agree recommend choosing bulbs that the deer tend to avoid.”

Such plants might include daffodils, allium (ornamental onion), hyacinth, grape hyacinth and crocus. 

And though not actually bulbs, you can venture into some of the other tuberous perennials like peony and tall bearded iris as well.

 

 

 

Grape Hyacinth: These beauties can make beautiful edging to other spring flowers.

Grape Hyacinth:

“We often use these beauties to make lovely edging to other spring flowers,” says Dave.

 

Crocus: These beauties are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

Crocus:

These delightful plants are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

 

Best Soils for Bulbs

Bulbs grow nicely  in many different soil types, but not in heavy, poorly draining soils. Ideally you should plant in soils that are organically rich, slightly acidic, well-drained sandy loams or loamy sands.

 

Parrot Tulips

Parrot Tulips

Inexpensive bulbs provide very early color in your garden beginning in early March through late mid-June.

“The ideal time to plant bulbs is late October, early November,” says Dave Stockwell. “Tulips, Daffodils, Allium, Hyacinths, Crocus, Lilies, etc. offer their own unique color, texture, height. Each require their own sun and shade tolerance; and some have fragrance, for example., Hyacinths.”

The way you install bulbs is probably the most important aspect of ensuring they flower in the following spring, say our experts. 

Each type of bulb has its own specified planting depth and spacing (see below). It is extremely important that you follow the proper depths — otherwise, the bulbs will not flower or may not leaf out. 

 

Crocus bulb:flower

Crocus bulb:flower

In addition, the pointy tip of the bulb must be planted straight up; otherwise the bulb will definitely not perform as intended.

 

Planting Depths for Spring Bulbs

Alliums: 8 inches

Crocus: 3 inches

Daffodil: 6 inches

Hyacinth: 7 inches

Tulips: 6 inches

 

 

 

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

 

 

Audrey Hepburn said ‘To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.’ When you plant this little brown bulb in the soil, you plant the hope that you’ll see it break ground and bloom in the spring.

 

 

 

 

 

Tulips, Tulips, Tulips:  

Tulips, Tulips, Tulips:

Note from Deck and Patio: These beauties are some of the first heralds that spring has arrived. It’s no wonder that Ms. Hepburn and the producers of “Gardens of the World..” chose them as a focus of an episode — and that they are one of the horticulturist’s suggested bulbs.

 

By |2022-10-20T11:48:28-05:00October 20th, 2022|fall maintenance, Gardening, outdoor maintenance, Seasonal Landscapes, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Fall Planting Is for All Seasons

How We Can All Help the Earth Heal

This week, The Washington Post ran an article entitled: “You – yes, you! – can help the planet. Start in your backyard.”

We’re sharing some of these ideas today.

 

Creating Safe Habitats for Caterpillars

Creating Safe Habitats for Caterpillars

Monarch Butterfly

Monarch Butterfly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning with simply offering pollinators, like the endangered Monarch butterfly, a place to stop, eat, and rest, e.g., on a flower pot on your balcony, or planting milkweed in your garden to lay their eggs, is doing much.

 

Hummingbirds

 

Put Out a Welcome Mat for Hummingbirds

Put Out a Welcome Mat for Hummingbirds

 

 

These beautiful birds are wonderful pollinators. Bright colored flowers encourage their long slender bills and tube-like tongues for take in nectar — fueling them for their busy work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thing the Post piece emphasizes is using native plants to attract pollinators in general. We’re happy to say Butterfly milkweed, a favorite of Monarchs, is native to Long Island as well as the following plants:

 

Black Eyed Susans (Photo: Hicks Nurseries):

Black Eyed Susans (Photo: Hicks Nurseries):

Great for attracting butterflies, these biennials, Black Eyed Susans, are also a haven for other pollinators like bees. Their bright yellow petals and dark centers can’t help but make you smile.

 

 

Easy to Maintain Pond Ecosystem:

Easy to Maintain Pond Ecosystem:

Many coneflowers (Echinacea) are also native to Long Island which you can see on the right of this water feature system consists of a stream, waterfalls and pond, and it is the perfect spot for letting the day’s care’s melt away.

 

Don’t Forget About the Bees

Washington Post Feature Article on Bees

Washington Post Feature Article on Bees

Lastly, don’t forget about those other important pollinators — the bees. Speaking of the Washington Post, several weeks ago they had a wonderful article entitled “The consciousness of bees.” In it, a professor at Queen Mary University of London describes studies that indicate that bees have “surprisingly rich inner worlds.” 

It is a touching piece, which may leave you quite moved by these little creatures, if you weren’t so already.

As for plants that bees love, you’ll find that those listed above today will benefit them as well as butterflies and hummingbirds.

 

Note: The original Post article mentioned today offers other ideas for lawns and landscaping and Deck and Patio is happy to help our clients make adjustments in their yards to create havens for pollinators and make your yard more earth-friendly. And more beautiful! — if we say so ourselves. 

 

Add Some Color to your Labor Day Weekend Bash

It’s not too late for you to get a few pots of flowers or plants to brighten up your deck, patio, or pool area for Labor Day Weekend. Even if you’re not hosting a party yourself, if are attending someone else’s, fresh plantings allow you to create a special hostess gift, like a bouquet from your very own garden.

 

Multi-level Patios

Multi-level Patios Enhanced With Bright Plantings

These Deck and Patio clients (immediately above) wanted some color as they and guests move from one patio up to another. Note the bright red Anemones on the left and yellow Coneflowers on the right. With lots of additional green ferns, the natural stone steps feel like a true nature walk. 

 

Close Up of Coneflowers

Close Up of Coneflowers

Here’s a nice close up of coneflowers. Also known as aka Echinacea, thee are perfect for summer into fall. Native to our neck of the woods, they thrive in our climate. Not to mention, butterflies love them in case any Monarchs are passing by. They come in pink (like our feature photo above, red, orange, white and yellow. 

 

Wooden Bench Beside Brown Wood Fence

Wooden Bench Beside Brown Wood Fence

As you can see from this photo, you don’t require a resort to add a few pops of color. Here, it’s just a simple wooden bench that becomes celebrated by hanging a few planters on a complementary brown wood fence.

 

Anemone Windflower -- or "Honorine Jobert

Anemone Windflower — or “Honorine Jobert

Honorine Jobert offer bright yellow hearts and are a great choice to plant mid-to-late August. The Windflower will bloom through October and it prefers shade-to-partial sun, and moist, well-drained soil.

 

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead)

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead)

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead) boasts purple/red flowerings; it also does well in both shade and sun.

 

Sedum or Autumn Joy

Sedum or Autumn Joy

Sedums like the “upright” like Autumn Joy, as well as Asters, are also great choices. These prefer sun and are available in many different varieties and shades of pink and purple.

 

 

 

Add Pops of Color Poolside

Add Pops of Color Poolside

 

 

“It’s easy to make a splash this Labor Day weekend with bright plantings around your property,” says Dave Stockwell. “These ideas for adding color and beauty will not only make Labor Day Weekend entertaining colorful, but the impact will last well into the fall.” 

 

Celebrating Labor Day at Home: Just Add Water and Some Color

Getaways, by car or air, can be costly. Not to mention the crowds.

 

Labor Day Fun

Labor Day Fun

 

One way to not break the bank over the long Labor Day weekend is to simply enjoy it at home. Plant some colorful fall flowers, fire up the grill, string a few lights and set out the comfortable lounge furniture and chairs.

 

 

 

 

But a long weekend isn’t just one big bash. There’s plenty of time to relax outdoors and just enjoy the promised good weather we’re expecting.  And to give this experience just a little more zen — consider adding a bit of flowing water to your backyard scene.

For example, there’s one easy garden complement that makes any landscaped area transformative in how it delights the soul. Even small gardens become something wonderful when the sights and sounds of flowing water are added.

Those who know Deck and Patio for our larger pond/water feature installations (we’ve done over 300 on Long Island alone) may be surprised that we also specialize in smaller water features such as fountains.

Stacked Stone Urn fountain

Stacked Stone Urn fountain

This photo is one such garden fountain that we added for clients who had recently moved to a new home. (This fountain is also seen above as our feature photo) 

When working at their property, one of our team members mentioned that it felt like the garden was missing something — a feature that would offer both the sound and relaxing sight of water movement. 

The clients agreed that a garden fountain would be an ideal finishing touch in such limited space.

 

And here’s a 5-second video for you to hear the water music of that installation: 

 

 

DIY Fountain Projects

Deck and Patio can install a fountain for you. However, if you’d like to add one of these fountains on your own, all you need is a shovel, a wheelbarrow and a level. 

Then, adding a bag of decorative gravel and mulch, you have a picture-perfect-and-sound-perfect-fountain that not only you will enjoy but so will many of nature’s lovable wildlife.

 

 

Add Some Color

Add Some Color

 

 

So dress up your deck and comfortable seating areas with some flowers and the sounds of flowing water. Grill up something tasty — and avoid the crowds — and the costs. 

 

 

 

 

By |2022-08-18T12:41:25-05:00August 18th, 2022|Family Fun, Gardening, Landscape Planning, Landscaping, Outdoor Living|Comments Off on Celebrating Labor Day at Home: Just Add Water and Some Color

For Mother’s Day Flowers: Think ‘Aquatic’

 

If Mom has a backyard pond, stream or water fountain, rather than giving her the usual bouquet, how about gifting her plants for her outdoor waterscape.

 

Plants for Water Fountains

 

Aquascape Inc. Garden Fountain

Aquascape Inc. Garden Fountain

 

A water fountain that is set in a basin is the perfect spot for adding flowers and greenery. Consider free-floating plants which are perfect for a fountain garden. 

Tip: Don’t forget a bit of Miracle Gro. In a fountain basin, floaters won’t get nutrients from other decaying plants that are found in ponds, etc., so they’ll need some nutrients. 

Another tip: Put these plants in the calmest section of the fountain’s basin so they don’t get too much water splashed on them. If the basin is large enough, perhaps there’s room for a few koi as well. Koi and aquatic plants work well together in keeping a healthy waterscape.

 

 

 

 

Here’s a very short video of the sounds and beauty of a fountain-garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deck and Patio Built Pond

Deck and Patio Built Pond

Aquascape Inc., in St. Charles, IL — the country’s leading experts on all things pond and water gardens — describes the basic groups of aquatic plants as:

  • Water Lilies Lotus
  • Marginal Plants Water Lily-like Plants
  • Floating Plants Submerged Plants

And don’t worry if you’re choosing the right plant. Ponds are all the more beautiful with a variety of greenery and color.

“In fact, the best designs for ponds and water gardens utilize a wide mixture of plants in different heights, textures and color from at least three of the above groups,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell. 

“This gives the most natural look. When installing these, at Deck and Patio we don’t do it in a symmetrical way. We find that a more random placement provides the most natural look.”

 

And when it comes to gift giving, “random” makes the choosing all the easier.

 

Here’s some more aquatic plant ideas:

 

Aquatic Plants and Pond Landscaping (Long Island/NY):

Aquatic Plants and Pond Landscaping (Long Island/NY):

 

The tall aquatic plant on the left of the pond (canna lily) offers a nice tall statement. It thrives in water conditions that are 70-80 degrees F, with a pH of 6.5-7.5. 

They’re also easy to care for, love natural light and are ideally suited near the edges of a pond. The weeping hemlock at the top right in the photo flourishes in moist soil and offers a bit of shade which helps balance the water temperature.

 

 

Aquatic Plants (Long Island/NY):

Aquatic Plants (Long Island/NY):

 

 

So think water garden plants for this mother’s day. These plants will live a long time in their water bed. And with the outdoor season coming fast toward us, Mom will thank you indeed for the extra color and texture around her favorite sitting spot. 

 

 

 

 

 

Pondside: Relaxing and Dining ’Al Fresco’

Even before COVID, dining and relaxing ‘al fresco’ has long been part of the outdoor experience for those with a backyard pond. 

With weather warming, and Memorial Weekend not all that far off, now is a great time to plan a backyard upgrade with a view to enjoying delightful pondside dining and relaxation right at home.

As Certified Contractors of Aquascape Inc. — one of the country’s leading manufacturers of pond and water feature products — Deck and Patio continually stays informed and trained on all the latest techniques and technologies for ideal waterscapes.

Each year, our expert teams can be found installing ponds, water gardens and other water features across Long Island and her environs. And because of our breadth of expertise, we can design/build a complete oasis, including decks and patios, pools, custom and portable hot tubs to complement any waterscape.

We also specialize in eco-friendly ponds sustained through rainwater harvesting. “We also specialize in landscaping waterscapes with gorgeous water plants, stocked with healthy pond fish, and aerated with naturally-looking waterfalls,” says our own Dave Stockwell.

The one thing our ponds all have in common, adds Dave, is how much a backyard pond adds to each family’s outdoor experience. Having such a water feature — with the sounds of moving water and natural beauty this provides — makes outdoor living and dining an exceptional experience.

 

Pond-side Living:

Pond-side Living:

Deck and Patio designed/built a new deck with a viewing platform pondside where the family can dine and relax outdoors. You’ve heard of Xanadu, well how about Zen-adu. Imagine. After dinner they can walk across a set of large stepping stones to view the pond from another vantage point.

 

Al Fresco Drinks/Dining by a Pond:

Al Fresco Drinks/Dining by a Pond:

This feature photo (see also top of page), was shared with us by Aquascape Inc. Here a group of family and friends — and even someone’s favorite pet —- enjoy a meal beside an exquisite pond stocked with koi. Soothing sounds from the waterfall help everyone relax and be at ease.

 

Backyard Sanctuary Perfect for Dining Al Fresco:

Backyard Sanctuary Perfect for Dining Al Fresco:

Deck and Patio created this natural backyard retreat complete with a large deck and pond that comes up to it. Our design formed different settings and focal points; our team planted over 4,000 bulbs, 300 species of deciduous woody plants, evergreens, and perennials, including 150 different varieties of these species. 

Imagine having the option of dine on your deck or in a backyard glass conservatory. (Note: Deck and Patio did not build the conservatory but worked with the contractors the family hired to bring this beautiful project together harmoniously.)

 

“Deck” Pond Perfect for Dining Al Fresco:

“Deck” Pond Perfect for Dining Al Fresco:

Aquascape Inc. also provided us with this photo of a charming dining area set on a deck with pond. Note how the wall mural picks up where the real plants leave off, giving a smallish water garden area the sense of natural expanse. The homeowner also chose blue cushions to go with the mural’s water scenes, which helps to tie it all together.

 

A big thank you to Aquascape for sharing some of today’s photos with us.

 

Landscaping Ideas: Add Plants in Pantone’s ‘Very Peri’ Color

Very Peri’ is Pantone’s Color for 2022

Very Peri’ is Pantone’s Color for 2022

Last month, Pantone announced Very Peri as its 2022 color of the year. They made their choice with a view to encourage an “altered landscape of possibilities” during a time when our “notions and standards are changing,” 

Pantone believes that Very Peri “displays a needed spritely, joyous attitude and dynamic presence” helpful in encouraging creativity and imaginative expressions.” 

Pantone’s new color definitely provides homeowners with the opportunity to create contrast and interest in their landscapes.

“We frequently get requests for plants in the latest popular colors,” says our own Dave Stockwell. “We love helping them keep up with the times, while always ensuring any updates are in harmony with the rest of what’s there.”

Dave adds that even if families aren’t planning major updates to their properties, incorporating some fresh touches of color such as Pantone’s Very Peri is an easy change.

For those who’d like to get started planning some seasonal floral updates, here’s just some plants that mimic Very Peri nicely:

 

Periwinkles

Periwinkles: This flower’s color and name may have inspired Pantone’s choice for 2022. “It’s such a superb spreading shrub, we like it because it’s great for erosion control. Grown as a ground cover, it blooms in April and May.”

This plant also helps control the growth of weeds. It’s a good climber, too. Caution: Plant it on its own where it won’t overtake or choke valuable plantings. It likes partial shade and acidic soil. If you don’t want it to spread too far and rapidly, you can plant it in full sun.

 

 

Iris

Iris

 

 

Iris: These beauties come in a variety of sizes and colors. Mark your calendar as the best time to plant them is late summer to early autumn. Most varieties need full sun. “We always recommend preparing the planting beds ahead. 

About two weeks before, loosen the soil in a depth close to a foot to allow for good drainage. They don’t need much water except just before bloom time. Caution: These plants are bad if ingested and definitely are not good for your pets. 

 

 

 

 

Delphinium elatum

Delphinium elatum

Delphinium elatum: A member of the buttercup family, delphiniums are delightful perennials that add lovely color when they bloom during spring to early summer. A sturdy plant grows tall and is nicely herbaceous. 

“In our neck of the woods,” says Dave, “these plants require special care, but are worth the effort we think.”

Perhaps in keeping with Pantone’s purpose in choosing the Very Peri color, these old-fashioned flowers, if you’ve got the time to care for them, can make a magnificent statement. 

They require high fertility, careful staking to keep them standing in rainstorms, etc. Give them space to spread out and ample air circulation. For more on this, check out this article.  

 

 

Feature Photo

Feature Photo: Hydrangea

 

Feature Photo at top of page: We selected hydrangea as our feature photo today because it not only is available in Pantone’s Very Peri color but is a favorite here on Long Island and easy to grow.  

More plantings available in this color choice are: hyacinths, verbena bonariensis, clematis ‘multi blue,’ nemesia denim blue, and, of course, one of our favorites — alliums! 

 

 

Landscaping: As Leaves Start to Fall, Think Spring!

 

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

Horticulturist, Sandra Vultaggio

 

Frankly, everyone loves the first sight of bright cheery flowers that tell us winter is finally over. Well, such welcome flowers grow from bulbs planted in the chilly weather of fall — late October and November.

For planting ideas, we spoke a while back with Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant, who had some wonderful tips on planting bulbs.

 

 

 

When to Plant Spring Bulbs

Waiting until the soil temperature in fall has dipped to about 55°F is ideal. Usually this corresponds to overnight air temperatures cooling to around 40 – 50°F.

 

Which Bulbs to Plant in Fall

Deer-Proofing Your Garden 

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

“We have a considerable deer population on Long Island,” says our own Dave Stockwell. “And we agree wholeheartedly with Sandra who recommends choosing bulbs that the deer tend to avoid.”

Such plants she recommends includes daffodils, allium (ornamental onion), hyacinth, grape hyacinth and crocus. 

“And though not actually bulbs, you can venture into some of the other tuberous perennials like peony and tall bearded iris as well,” adds Sandra.

 

 

 

Grape Hyacinth: “We often use these beauties to make lovely edging to other spring flowers,” says Dave. 

Grape Hyacinth: “We often use these beauties to make lovely edging to other spring flowers,” says Dave.

 

Crocus: These delightful plants are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.  

Crocus: These delightful plants are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

 

Best Soils for Bulbs

Sandra adds that bulbs grow nicely  in many different soil types. But the one site they don’t do well in is heavy, poorly draining soils. Ideally you should plant in soils that are organically rich, slightly acidic, well-drained “sandy loams or loamy sands.”

 

Spacing the Bulbs When Planting

If you are not using a landscaping firm like Deck and Patio to do the planting, it’s comforting to remember that all of the spacing information, etc. is provided as part of the growing instructions for each bulb. 

Planting depths even vary between varieties, depending on if you have a large “trumpet” variety, or the small ‘Tete A Tete’ varieties, says Sandra. Most bulbs will enjoy a sunny garden, but will usually perform well in a partially sunny garden as well.

 

Should You Compost

“Compost is not necessary to layer on top. If you feel your soil is lacking organic matter, you will be better off incorporating compost into the top 6” of soil before planting,” she adds. “Mix bonemeal or superphosphate with the soil at the bottom of the planting hole, or incorporate it into the soil around each bulb’s planting hole.”

What Tools Will You Need

As far as tools go, adds Sandra, to make the job easiest is to buy a bulb planter. “This is a metal garden gadget that you stick in the ground, pull it up and out comes a cylinder of soil. Place the bulb, right-side up into the hole, and cover back up with soil. If you don’t have a bulb planter, and garden trowel will do just fine.”

Short on time? Dig larger holes and place a few bulbs in each hole so the flowers come up in clumps, she says.

 

Ms. Vultaggio’s Spring Garden:   ‘Tete a tete’ daffodils brighten the horticulturist’s spring yard. 

Ms. Vultaggio’s Spring Garden:  
‘Tete a tete’ daffodils brighten the horticulturist’s spring yard.

 

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

We also asked Ms. Vultaggio what inspires her about spring flowers. She concluded today’s tips with: “Audrey Hepburn said ‘To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.’ I agree that when you plant this little brown bulb in the soil, you plant the hope that you’ll see it break ground and bloom in the spring.”

 

Tulips, Tulips, Tulips:  

Tulips, Tulips, Tulips:

Note from Deck and Patio: Ms. Vultaggio’s comment on Audrey Hepburn reminds us that one of the episodes on the actress’s series on world gardens covered tulips and spring bulbs.

These beauties are some of the first heralds that spring has arrived. It’s no wonder that Ms. Hepburn and the producers of “Gardens of the World..” chose them as a focus of an episode — and that they are one of the horticulturist’s suggested bulbs.

 

 

 

By |2021-10-28T10:54:11-05:00October 28th, 2021|Backyard Maintenance, fall maintenance, Gardening, Landscape Planning, Landscaping, Outdoor Living, Seasonal Landscapes, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Landscaping: As Leaves Start to Fall, Think Spring!

Spruce Up the Yard with Pops of Color this Labor Day

Labor Day Weekend — the last of summer’s three big holiday weekends — is just about two weeks away. And while it’s not the end of the outdoor season, it is one of the final big outdoor weekends for entertaining — even if we have to gather wearing masks etc.

In order to make your outdoor area extra special for Labor Day, how about  adding pops of plant color around your deck or patio. Even if you’re not hosting a party yourself, but are attending someone else’s, a refreshed plantings allows you to create a special hostess gift, like a bouquet from your very own garden.

Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant

Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant

 

And for some good news: It’s not too late to be adding flowers for Labor Day that will also last well into the fall. Sandra Vultaggio, Horticulture Consultant, has provided us with just the right plants to add this time of year.

“Late in the summer season is actually a great time to add some perennials,” says Vultaggio. “And you can usually get good deals on them this time of year.”\

As for which ones to look out for, she agrees with Deck and Patio that the beautiful Honorine Jobert Anemone (aka Windflower) with its bright yellow heart is a great choice to add mid-to-late August. The Windflower will bloom through October and it prefers shade-to-partial sun, and moist, well-drained soil.

 

Honorine Jobert Anemone (aka Windflower)

Honorine Jobert Anemone (aka Windflower)

 

Vultaggio offered several more perennial choices. For example, Chelone, (aka Turtlehead). “This purple/red flowering plant does well in both shade and sun,” she says.

 

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead)

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead)

 

Sedums (the “upright” like Autumn Joy), as well as Asters, are also great choices,” she continues. “These prefer sun and are available in many different varieties and shades of pink and purple.” 

 

Sedum — Autumn Joy

Sedum — Autumn Joy

 

For a sunny yellow option, Vultaggio suggests Solidago (aka Goldenrod) which also prefers full sun.

 

Solidago (aka Goldenrod)

Solidago (aka Goldenrod)

 

“I suggest getting these perennials in the ground sooner rather than later,” she continues. If it hasn’t rained before planting, soak the root systems thoroughly and keep them very well watered and mulched after planting.”

“It’s easy to make a splash this Labor Day weekend with bright plantings around your property,” adds Dave Stockwell. “Sandra’s ideas for adding color and beauty will not only make Labor Day Weekend entertaining colorful, but the impact will last well into the fall.”

 

Asters

Asters

 

 

Note: Our feature photo at the top of our blog page today shows a lovely colorful flower from the Aster family. 

 

 

 

By |2021-08-26T10:08:41-05:00August 26th, 2021|Backyard Refurbishments, Backyard Upgrades, Gardening, Landscape Planning, Landscaping, Living Landscapes, Outdoor Living, Seasonal Landscapes, Unique Ideas, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Spruce Up the Yard with Pops of Color this Labor Day
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