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Pantone’s 2023 Color of the Year: Living the ‘Viva Magenta’ Life

 

Artificial intelligence was used to generate Pantone’s images of the “Magentaverse.”

Artificial intelligence was used to generate Pantone’s images of the “Magentaverse.”

 

 

Pantone’s vivid crimson color — ‘Viva Magenta’ — is their 2023 color of the year. Elley Cheng, Pantone’s vice president and general manager, said that this tone “merges the warmth of the natural world with the endless, rich possibilities of the digital space.”

 

 

 

Pantone’s color choice may be intended to go beyond our natural world, However, Deck and Patio can’t help but keep our focus on how this vibrant cheerful color, which experts say inspires contentment, cheerfulness, and happiness, can be part of uplifting our clients’ daily lives.

Plant flowers, be happy

Plant flowers, be happy

 

Tip: Deck and Patio designers frequently receive requests for plants in the latest popular colors. We won’t be surprised to be asked for plantings in the vein of Pantone’s color for this year.

So let’s get planning our spring gardens — and magenta away.

 

Phlox paniculata:

Phlox paniculata:

 

 

These star-shaped perennials come in many colors, including a vibrant magenta. They bloom early spring and the tall phlox to mid-to-late summer. Low-growing phlox work well as ground cover while the tall phlox are a superb colorful backdrop.

“And the medium-height of phlox,” says our own Dave Stockwell, “offer a nice fragrance, are low maintenance and can nicely fill in any gaps.”

 

 

 

 

Magenta Coneflowers:

Magenta Coneflowers:

 

 

Today’s feature photo captures one of our pool landscaping projects, with magenta coneflowers helping to add cheer to this fun family space. 

Also known as Echinacea, these flowers are perfect for summer into fall. Native to our neck of the woods, they thrive in our climate. Not to mention, butterflies love them. 

 

 

 

Red Anemones

Magenta Red Anemones

 

Above a natural retaining wall, Deck and Patio carved out a patio area with waterfall where our clients can sit after a stroll and breathe it all in. Note the bright red Anemones on the left, across from the yellow Coneflowers. With lots of additional green ferns, the natural stone steps feel like a true nature walk. And that magenta red really makes you smile.

 

 

 

Monarda (Bee Balm)

Monarda (Bee Balm)

 

 

Native to North America, this beautiful flowering plant is from the mint family. It’s easy to grow, is deer resistant, and attracts pollinators. Its tubular flowers come in a variety colors including these magenta-red tubular flowers.

 

 

 

 

“There are loads of lovely magenta plants or flowers available for local gardens,” says Dave Stockwell. “Just speak with any member of our team, or contact our office, and we’ll be happy to include such cheerful blooms in your yard.”

 

 

Landscaping Tips: Be Prepared for Snow This Winter

Even though we’ve not been hit with much winter weather yet, if you believe the Almanac, their forecasts suggest a colder than usual winter and a snowfall above normal. December being a possibility they say, as are January and February. 

 

Acrobatics Required

Acrobatics Required

 

 

Even if snow is light, if it’s followed by sleet, and/or warming, then freezing, the driveway or walkway can become so slick that getting the family from the front door to the car can require the skills of a Cirque de Soleil acrobat.

 

 

 

 

 

So it’s a good idea to ‘be prepared. And here’s some winter snow tips — whether or not you are handling your own snow removal:

 

— Ensure your snow blower, roof rake, deicers etc. are readily at hand;

— If you have a generator, have it checked out to be sure it’s operating properly;

— Put some fresh batteries in your carbon monoxide monitor.

 

Snow Removal:

Snow Removal:

Speaking of snow blowers. Even an inexpensive one is better than using a shovel.

 If you’re going to shovel, coat the scoop part with non-stick cooking spray. 

And lastly, whether you are using a snow blower or shoveling, remove the snow in small increments — don’t try to do it all at once.

 

Now. The real fun begins. 

Pre-Storm Driveway Preparation

 

Plow Stakes

Plow Stakes

 

No matter who will be doing the plowing of your property — a firm like our own Dix Hills Snowplowing, or on your own — even before word that a storm is approaching, “prep” your property (or have it prepped) by installing fiberglass stakes (sometimes called “plow stakes” or “snow stakes”).

Note: wood plow/snow stakes aren’t as strong as fiberglass and can be easily damaged.

The idea is to highlight where any costly Belgium Block or other edging is located, keeping it from being damaged by snow plows. For more on this, click here.

 

 

Roof Prep

 

Gutters in Winter

Gutters in Winter

 

 

Snow can cause a lot of pressure on your roof. 

One of the best ways to remove it is with a roof rake, so it’s good to have it readily on hand.

Also take a look at your gutters to make sure ice doesn’t dam them up and cause leaking into your home or attic. 

Some experts recommend stringing heat cables through them, or on the roof just above the gutters.

This should be done, of course, before major snowstorms to avoid any Clark Griswald-like ice rockets from a frozen gutter fail.

 

 

 

 

Professional Snow Removal

 

Dix Hills Snowplowing

Dix Hills Snowplowing

Of course, the easiest way to handle some of this is to contact professionals like Deck and Patio’s Dix Hills Snowplowing.

In speaking with our own Office Manager, Linda LaRose, if you live in our corner of Suffolk County (Huntington/Dix Hills) and wish to have us take care of your snow removal, you can contact us with no obligation (631-549-8100).

Once we hear from you, Linda will email a contract to review and you can always call her with questions before signing on, or incurring any expense. When you make this initial contact, this would be the right time to let us know if you have any special requirements: e.g., early service, service at 1-inch (ours usually begins at 2”), sand service, if garage doors need to shoveled, mail box cleared, etc.

We can also stake the driveway for you, if you ask for it. (Note: For snow removal from roofs, you should contact a roof contractor for their specialized service.)

 

 

By |2022-12-08T14:12:45-05:00December 8th, 2022|Backyard Maintenance, Bullfrog Spas, Deck and Patios, Driveways, Landscaping, outdoor maintenance, Patios & Decks, paving stones, Seasonal Landscapes, Snow Removal, Techo-Bloc|Comments Off on Landscaping Tips: Be Prepared for Snow This Winter

Winter-Friendly Durable Construction Products

Our winters on Long Island don’t always come with a lot of snow, but we do face extended cold streaks. For this reason alone, Deck and Patio values durable construction products that also look good.

 

Techo-Bloc Construction Paver Materials

 

Snow Removal:

Snow Removal:

Techo-Bloc products are engineered in Canada where they require extra strength due to our neighboring country’s extreme weather changes. Their pavers handle very well the freeze/thaw that occurs in our own corner of the Northeast.

“The stones will remain adaptable, even, and stable for years, as long as they are installed properly,” says our own Dave Stockwell.

Techo-Bloc pavers are nearly three times stronger than poured concrete, And when it comes to snow, these pavers can be plowed and shoveled. 

Actually, the edges and joints around the pavers assist in melting snow and ice, says the manufacturer. And that using de-icing salt (sodium chloride or calcium chloride) to remove snow and ice will not harm these paving stones.

Deck and Patio Project Using Techo-Bloc

Deck and Patio Project Using Techo-Bloc

 

This photo shows how natural Techo-Bloc pavers look. Instead of one-sized bricks placed throughout your entire patio or retaining wall or driveway, their kits provide “random” instead of straight lines for a handsome outcome.

“These products are available in pavers, slabs, walls, for facing outdoor features such as fire pits, edging, and include permeable materials,” says Dave.

 

 

 

Fiberon Capped Composite Decking

 

Photo Courtesy of Fiberon

Photo Courtesy of Fiberon

Fiberon offers capped composite decking boards, like the ones shown here. They are made of materials and a cap that resist moisture. Fiberon boards include a “cover” that provide added protection against the elements and everyday living.

Most wood decking materials face challenges in holding up to such weather.  Even moisture-resistant woods require regular sealing and parts of the underside can’t help but trap moisture.

“While most reputable capped composite manufacturers produce superb products that are stain, insect, mold and splinter resistant,” says Dave Stockwell, “Fiberon’s special warranty can also be a factor. Not only do clients get the usual 25-year warranty on materials, with Fiberon they also get a five-year warranty on labor.”

That said, the most important aspect to ongoing outdoor winter enjoyment is to remove any existing snow.

“Whether you have a wood or capped-composite deck, we recommend not using metal shovels for this, but plastic ones. If you feel it necessary to use de-icing materials, rock salt is the best choice for any deck surface.  Be sure to choose rock salt that is labeled safe for flagstone or concrete and will not kill grass.”

 

Award-winning Deck and Patio Fiberon Project

Award-winning Deck and Patio Fiberon Project

The Director of Marketing Communications at Fiberon, Edie Kelly does not recommend using sand to remove ice and snow because that can mar a deck’s surface.

“If the snow is light, a broom is a good choice or, again, a plastic shovel, Kello recommends sweeping the used rock salt into the trash, then rinsing the deck off to remove any residue. This is especially important if you have pets.

“You can use a pressure washer if you like, but we recommend not going beyond 3,000 PSI (pounds per square inch). Also, keep the nozzle about 10” above the deck. This applies to both wood and composite decking.“

Fiberon also says it is important to shovel parallel to the boards and not horizontally.

 

 

Snowy, Icy Landscape

Snowy, Icy Landscape

 

Backyard Upgrades: As you learn the best ways to enjoy your deck and patio during winter, it’s a great time to ponder what changes you’d like to make for spring.

And it’s okay if you have no idea how to look through snow and plan for spring. The key is: design/build experts like Deck and patio do know. And we can help you see through winter to spring.

 

 

 

Pond Maintenance Tips for Fall

 

Netting Ponds in Fall.

Netting Ponds in Fall.

 

 

Our blog a few weeks ago reminded pond lovers to net their pond before the leaves fall. And after you’ve captured them by the net, you can simply pull it out and once again enjoy your pond unobstructed.

But what’s required once the leaves have fallen?

 

 

 

Aquatic Plants Maintenance

 

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

“After all the leaves have fallen, this is the right time to trim back and remove any dead foliage from aquatic plants,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell. “This helps remove excessive organic material that would otherwise decompose in your water feature. Such decaying material can cause excess gasses and undesirable algae.”

Pond lilies, like you see in this Deck and Patio pond photo, are idyllic water plants for a variety of reasons. But they tend to need a little maintenance in fall. It’s a good idea to cut them back to just about the base of the plant; also trim back any marginal plants that might eventually droop over into the water.

 

 

 

 

Chemical Pond Treatments

 

Leaves In Backyard Stream 

Leaves In Backyard Stream

 

 

 

Even with great care, you’ll find that some leaves/debris make it into your pond. Dave Kelly of Aquasacpe Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).

Kelly recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.  (Photo: Aquascape Inc.)

 

 

 

 

Caring for Pond Fish

 

You can — and should — plump up your koi darlings to survive winter hibernation. As temperatures start to drop, gradually increase how much you feed them. When your pond’s water gets below 59 degrees, we recommend using fish food made for cold water. 

Note: As the temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them. Once water temperatures go below 55 degrees, says Kelly, the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. 

And when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

 

Pond Fish in Fall:

Pond Fish in Fall:

There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. However, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely

 

Healthy Ponds:

Healthy Ponds:

Once Spring arrives, and your pond and fish are healthy and thriving, you’ll be glad you took such good care of your pond in the Fall.

 

There! That’s not so bad, is it. Just remember: a little fall maintenance makes all the difference.

 

Fall Planting Is for All Seasons

As Ms. Hepburn said, a garden is truly to believe in tomorrow — a happy tomorrow full of color. 

And there’s no better time than now to begin exercising that belief. Late fall is the perfect time to plant bulbs. 

When the temperature in fall has dropped to about 55 degrees F and the overnight drops to between 40 and 50, this is the ideal time to plant bulbs for spring.

So let’s get to which plants thrive and grow best in our neck of the woods.

 

Which Bulbs to Plant in Fall

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

Deer-Proofing Your Garden

 

“We have a considerable deer population on Long Island,” says our own Dave Stockwell. “And we agree recommend choosing bulbs that the deer tend to avoid.”

Such plants might include daffodils, allium (ornamental onion), hyacinth, grape hyacinth and crocus. 

And though not actually bulbs, you can venture into some of the other tuberous perennials like peony and tall bearded iris as well.

 

 

 

Grape Hyacinth: These beauties can make beautiful edging to other spring flowers.

Grape Hyacinth:

“We often use these beauties to make lovely edging to other spring flowers,” says Dave.

 

Crocus: These beauties are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

Crocus:

These delightful plants are often the first flower you see in spring. And they return year after year.

 

Best Soils for Bulbs

Bulbs grow nicely  in many different soil types, but not in heavy, poorly draining soils. Ideally you should plant in soils that are organically rich, slightly acidic, well-drained sandy loams or loamy sands.

 

Parrot Tulips

Parrot Tulips

Inexpensive bulbs provide very early color in your garden beginning in early March through late mid-June.

“The ideal time to plant bulbs is late October, early November,” says Dave Stockwell. “Tulips, Daffodils, Allium, Hyacinths, Crocus, Lilies, etc. offer their own unique color, texture, height. Each require their own sun and shade tolerance; and some have fragrance, for example., Hyacinths.”

The way you install bulbs is probably the most important aspect of ensuring they flower in the following spring, say our experts. 

Each type of bulb has its own specified planting depth and spacing (see below). It is extremely important that you follow the proper depths — otherwise, the bulbs will not flower or may not leaf out. 

 

Crocus bulb:flower

Crocus bulb:flower

In addition, the pointy tip of the bulb must be planted straight up; otherwise the bulb will definitely not perform as intended.

 

Planting Depths for Spring Bulbs

Alliums: 8 inches

Crocus: 3 inches

Daffodil: 6 inches

Hyacinth: 7 inches

Tulips: 6 inches

 

 

 

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

Spring Flowers Inspiration:

 

 

Audrey Hepburn said ‘To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.’ When you plant this little brown bulb in the soil, you plant the hope that you’ll see it break ground and bloom in the spring.

 

 

 

 

 

Tulips, Tulips, Tulips:  

Tulips, Tulips, Tulips:

Note from Deck and Patio: These beauties are some of the first heralds that spring has arrived. It’s no wonder that Ms. Hepburn and the producers of “Gardens of the World..” chose them as a focus of an episode — and that they are one of the horticulturist’s suggested bulbs.

 

By |2022-10-20T11:48:28-05:00October 20th, 2022|fall maintenance, Gardening, outdoor maintenance, Seasonal Landscapes, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Fall Planting Is for All Seasons

Pond Netting Makes for Easy Fall Maintenance

Fallen Leaves Affect Pond Ecosystems

Fallen Leaves Affect Pond Ecosystems

For most of Long Island, NY, we are nearing the mid-point of fall foliage color change right now. That means there’s still time to do some quick preventative maintenance in and around your pond or water feature.

“Any leaves left in your feature’s water will cause a messy clean up come spring,” says our own Dave Stockwell.

But pond netting, Dave reminds us, will capture any falling leaves. “Plus it doesn’t ruin the enjoyment of your pond or water feature. Netting may not be the most beautiful addition, but it’s up only a short while.”

The key is to get your netting up before the leaves fall. Then simply pull it out once they’ve changed and dropped

“Just be sure to tent the netting so that it doesn’t sag into the pond water when it’s weighted with leaves,” adds Dave.

 

Value of Pond Netting: (Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape, Inc.)

Value of Pond Netting: (Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape, Inc.)

 

Dave adds that if you are late in putting up the netting, you can always use a long-handle pond net to clear out the debris. It’s just much easier if you use the netting.

Another good idea is to trim back and remove any dead foliage from the aquatic plants before or after you put up the netting. “This cuts down excessive organic material that might otherwise decompose in the water feature,” says Dave.

 

Caring for Pond Lilies in Fall:

Caring for Pond Lilies in Fall:

One of the plants that requires trimming is the pond lily. They are idyllic water plants but unless it is cut back to just about its base, it might droop over into the water. This is true of any other marginal plants you have around the edges of your pond.

 

Treating Unwanted Pond Debris: (Photo: Aquascape, Inc.)

Treating Unwanted Pond Debris: (Photo: Aquascape, Inc.)

 

 

Since some debris will make it into your pond no matter how hard you work, Aquascape Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).  Their expert, Dave Kelly, recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.

There may be a little work involved, but the joys of autumn are well worth it. Fall foliage viewing, apple picking, and evenings beside fire pits while the kids roast marshmallows — all working up to the big day: Halloween — is a very small effort to pay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeding Your Koi: Fall Requires New Routines

 

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

 

And you think you have digestion issues. Well, according to top experts (e.g., The Pond Guy/Aquascape Inc.), your pond fish have real issues digesting their food when the temperature changes.

“Keep feeding your fish summer food,” says our own Dave Stockwell, “as long as the weather is consistently warm. Do this until it gets consistently cool. It’s then you should switch to cold weather food.”

 

 

Regularly Check Pond Water Temperature

Feeding Pond Fish in Fall

Feeding Pond Fish in Fall

Begin checking your pond’s water temperature beginning in early fall.

When pond water gets below 59 degrees, you can — and should — plump up your koi darlings to survive winter hibernation. Using fish food made for cold water, gradually increase how much you feed these lovely fish as temperatures start to drop.

As the water temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them. Once temperatures go below 55 degrees, says Dave Kelly, from Aquascape inc., the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. 

And when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

So even though there is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely.

 

 

Aquatic Plants Maintenance

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

 

“Fall is also a good time to trim back and remove any dead foliage from your pond’s aquatic plants this time of year,” says Dave Stockwell. “This helps remove excessive organic material that would otherwise decompose in the water feature. Such decaying material can cause excess gasses and undesirable algae.”

Pond lilies, for example, which are idyllic water plants, tend to need a little maintenance in fall. It’s a good idea to cut them back to just about the base of the plant; also trim back any marginal plants that might eventually droop over into the water.

 

 

 

Pond Fish in Fall:

Pond Fish in Fall:

There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. Just a reminder, however. Once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely. 

Welcome to fall!

 

A Few Maintenance/Planting Tips – Before the Leaves Fall

Over the next weeks, we’ll provide more in depth information on specific fall backyard maintenance. But today, we’ve got a few tips to begin planning.

 

Fall Foliage Is Coming

Fall Foliage Is Coming

 

 

It may be weeks yet before you’ll have to face falling leaves, but for sure that colorful foliage will fall in the not too distant future. So kick back and give a few thoughts to some backyard maintenance that can be done now — and that might make falling leaves less of a problem.

 

 

 

 

Pruning at: Berkshire Botanical Garden

Pruning at: Berkshire Botanical Garden

 

Pruning is not something to wait doing. Actually right now — on the cusp of early fall — is the ideal time for this bit of maintenance. Cutting plants back now will give them enough time to callous over before the first frost.

Without callouses, frost can cause them to die back or not bloom come spring. And we don’t want that.

 

 

 

 

Ponds

Pond Netting

Pond Netting

If you have a pond or water feature, before too long, it will be time to protect your feature from falling leaves.

“Netting your pond before fall foliage is important,” says Dave Stockwell, owner of Deck and Patio. “But once the leaves have all fallen, you can pull out the netting and easily dispose of the leaves and have pristine clear water come spring. By the way, water features can be enjoyed all through fall, and even into winter.”

Pond experts suggest “tenting” the net so it doesn’t sag into the water when it becomes heavy with leaves and debris.

It’s also a good idea to trim back aquatic plants to reduce the amount of organic material decomposing in the colder months.

 

Tree Trimming

Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape Inc.

Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape Inc.

 

Before the leaves start falling off your trees, check them out to see if there are any branches that do not have leaves on them.

“This will tell you which branches might offer potential problems later down the road,” says Dave.

“Come the cold weather, dead limbs snap off due to the weight of ice and snow. This can cause havoc with power lines. Not to mention they can be a source of accidents to cars, people and homes.”

So, tree trimming should be on that “to do” list before the leaves fall.

 

 

 

Plantings

Skimmia:

Skimmia: (Photo Credit: Musical Linguist at the English language Wikipedia)

To give plants a head start before spring, beginning now, through the end of October, is a great time to be planting.

Many of you will, of course, be thinking of planting bulbs for spring beauties like tulips, daffodils etc. But you can get all kinds of perennials in the ground now that will give you buds in spring, and color next fall/winter.

In an earlier blog, we discussed — Skimmia — along with other plants that offer color in the colder months. In spring these will give you vibrant white flowers; in fall, crimson red fruits (berries) that last through winter.

 

 

 

Deck and Patio pond project built during winter

Deck and Patio pond project built during winter

 

 

A bit of effort before the leaves fall — brings big rewards come next outdoor season. Clean pond water, tidy and safe yards, blooming with color.

 

 

 

 

 

By |2022-09-15T13:35:07-05:00September 15th, 2022|Backyard Maintenance, Backyard Refurbishments, fall maintenance, Landscaping, Outdoor Living, outdoor maintenance, Plants, Ponds & Water Features, Seasonal Landscapes, Streams, trees|Comments Off on A Few Maintenance/Planting Tips – Before the Leaves Fall

How We Can All Help the Earth Heal

This week, The Washington Post ran an article entitled: “You – yes, you! – can help the planet. Start in your backyard.”

We’re sharing some of these ideas today.

 

Creating Safe Habitats for Caterpillars

Creating Safe Habitats for Caterpillars

Monarch Butterfly

Monarch Butterfly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning with simply offering pollinators, like the endangered Monarch butterfly, a place to stop, eat, and rest, e.g., on a flower pot on your balcony, or planting milkweed in your garden to lay their eggs, is doing much.

 

Hummingbirds

 

Put Out a Welcome Mat for Hummingbirds

Put Out a Welcome Mat for Hummingbirds

 

 

These beautiful birds are wonderful pollinators. Bright colored flowers encourage their long slender bills and tube-like tongues for take in nectar — fueling them for their busy work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thing the Post piece emphasizes is using native plants to attract pollinators in general. We’re happy to say Butterfly milkweed, a favorite of Monarchs, is native to Long Island as well as the following plants:

 

Black Eyed Susans (Photo: Hicks Nurseries):

Black Eyed Susans (Photo: Hicks Nurseries):

Great for attracting butterflies, these biennials, Black Eyed Susans, are also a haven for other pollinators like bees. Their bright yellow petals and dark centers can’t help but make you smile.

 

 

Easy to Maintain Pond Ecosystem:

Easy to Maintain Pond Ecosystem:

Many coneflowers (Echinacea) are also native to Long Island which you can see on the right of this water feature system consists of a stream, waterfalls and pond, and it is the perfect spot for letting the day’s care’s melt away.

 

Don’t Forget About the Bees

Washington Post Feature Article on Bees

Washington Post Feature Article on Bees

Lastly, don’t forget about those other important pollinators — the bees. Speaking of the Washington Post, several weeks ago they had a wonderful article entitled “The consciousness of bees.” In it, a professor at Queen Mary University of London describes studies that indicate that bees have “surprisingly rich inner worlds.” 

It is a touching piece, which may leave you quite moved by these little creatures, if you weren’t so already.

As for plants that bees love, you’ll find that those listed above today will benefit them as well as butterflies and hummingbirds.

 

Note: The original Post article mentioned today offers other ideas for lawns and landscaping and Deck and Patio is happy to help our clients make adjustments in their yards to create havens for pollinators and make your yard more earth-friendly. And more beautiful! — if we say so ourselves. 

 

Add Some Color to your Labor Day Weekend Bash

It’s not too late for you to get a few pots of flowers or plants to brighten up your deck, patio, or pool area for Labor Day Weekend. Even if you’re not hosting a party yourself, if are attending someone else’s, fresh plantings allow you to create a special hostess gift, like a bouquet from your very own garden.

 

Multi-level Patios

Multi-level Patios Enhanced With Bright Plantings

These Deck and Patio clients (immediately above) wanted some color as they and guests move from one patio up to another. Note the bright red Anemones on the left and yellow Coneflowers on the right. With lots of additional green ferns, the natural stone steps feel like a true nature walk. 

 

Close Up of Coneflowers

Close Up of Coneflowers

Here’s a nice close up of coneflowers. Also known as aka Echinacea, thee are perfect for summer into fall. Native to our neck of the woods, they thrive in our climate. Not to mention, butterflies love them in case any Monarchs are passing by. They come in pink (like our feature photo above, red, orange, white and yellow. 

 

Wooden Bench Beside Brown Wood Fence

Wooden Bench Beside Brown Wood Fence

As you can see from this photo, you don’t require a resort to add a few pops of color. Here, it’s just a simple wooden bench that becomes celebrated by hanging a few planters on a complementary brown wood fence.

 

Anemone Windflower -- or "Honorine Jobert

Anemone Windflower — or “Honorine Jobert

Honorine Jobert offer bright yellow hearts and are a great choice to plant mid-to-late August. The Windflower will bloom through October and it prefers shade-to-partial sun, and moist, well-drained soil.

 

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead)

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead)

Chelone, (aka Turtlehead) boasts purple/red flowerings; it also does well in both shade and sun.

 

Sedum or Autumn Joy

Sedum or Autumn Joy

Sedums like the “upright” like Autumn Joy, as well as Asters, are also great choices. These prefer sun and are available in many different varieties and shades of pink and purple.

 

 

 

Add Pops of Color Poolside

Add Pops of Color Poolside

 

 

“It’s easy to make a splash this Labor Day weekend with bright plantings around your property,” says Dave Stockwell. “These ideas for adding color and beauty will not only make Labor Day Weekend entertaining colorful, but the impact will last well into the fall.” 

 

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