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Pond Maintenance Tips for Fall

 

Netting Ponds in Fall.

Netting Ponds in Fall.

 

 

Our blog a few weeks ago reminded pond lovers to net their pond before the leaves fall. And after you’ve captured them by the net, you can simply pull it out and once again enjoy your pond unobstructed.

But what’s required once the leaves have fallen?

 

 

 

Aquatic Plants Maintenance

 

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

“After all the leaves have fallen, this is the right time to trim back and remove any dead foliage from aquatic plants,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell. “This helps remove excessive organic material that would otherwise decompose in your water feature. Such decaying material can cause excess gasses and undesirable algae.”

Pond lilies, like you see in this Deck and Patio pond photo, are idyllic water plants for a variety of reasons. But they tend to need a little maintenance in fall. It’s a good idea to cut them back to just about the base of the plant; also trim back any marginal plants that might eventually droop over into the water.

 

 

 

 

Chemical Pond Treatments

 

Leaves In Backyard Stream 

Leaves In Backyard Stream

 

 

 

Even with great care, you’ll find that some leaves/debris make it into your pond. Dave Kelly of Aquasacpe Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).

Kelly recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.  (Photo: Aquascape Inc.)

 

 

 

 

Caring for Pond Fish

 

You can — and should — plump up your koi darlings to survive winter hibernation. As temperatures start to drop, gradually increase how much you feed them. When your pond’s water gets below 59 degrees, we recommend using fish food made for cold water. 

Note: As the temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them. Once water temperatures go below 55 degrees, says Kelly, the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. 

And when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

 

Pond Fish in Fall:

Pond Fish in Fall:

There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. However, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely

 

Healthy Ponds:

Healthy Ponds:

Once Spring arrives, and your pond and fish are healthy and thriving, you’ll be glad you took such good care of your pond in the Fall.

 

There! That’s not so bad, is it. Just remember: a little fall maintenance makes all the difference.

 

Pond Netting Makes for Easy Fall Maintenance

Fallen Leaves Affect Pond Ecosystems

Fallen Leaves Affect Pond Ecosystems

For most of Long Island, NY, we are nearing the mid-point of fall foliage color change right now. That means there’s still time to do some quick preventative maintenance in and around your pond or water feature.

“Any leaves left in your feature’s water will cause a messy clean up come spring,” says our own Dave Stockwell.

But pond netting, Dave reminds us, will capture any falling leaves. “Plus it doesn’t ruin the enjoyment of your pond or water feature. Netting may not be the most beautiful addition, but it’s up only a short while.”

The key is to get your netting up before the leaves fall. Then simply pull it out once they’ve changed and dropped

“Just be sure to tent the netting so that it doesn’t sag into the pond water when it’s weighted with leaves,” adds Dave.

 

Value of Pond Netting: (Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape, Inc.)

Value of Pond Netting: (Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape, Inc.)

 

Dave adds that if you are late in putting up the netting, you can always use a long-handle pond net to clear out the debris. It’s just much easier if you use the netting.

Another good idea is to trim back and remove any dead foliage from the aquatic plants before or after you put up the netting. “This cuts down excessive organic material that might otherwise decompose in the water feature,” says Dave.

 

Caring for Pond Lilies in Fall:

Caring for Pond Lilies in Fall:

One of the plants that requires trimming is the pond lily. They are idyllic water plants but unless it is cut back to just about its base, it might droop over into the water. This is true of any other marginal plants you have around the edges of your pond.

 

Treating Unwanted Pond Debris: (Photo: Aquascape, Inc.)

Treating Unwanted Pond Debris: (Photo: Aquascape, Inc.)

 

 

Since some debris will make it into your pond no matter how hard you work, Aquascape Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).  Their expert, Dave Kelly, recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.

There may be a little work involved, but the joys of autumn are well worth it. Fall foliage viewing, apple picking, and evenings beside fire pits while the kids roast marshmallows — all working up to the big day: Halloween — is a very small effort to pay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeding Your Koi: Fall Requires New Routines

 

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

 

And you think you have digestion issues. Well, according to top experts (e.g., The Pond Guy/Aquascape Inc.), your pond fish have real issues digesting their food when the temperature changes.

“Keep feeding your fish summer food,” says our own Dave Stockwell, “as long as the weather is consistently warm. Do this until it gets consistently cool. It’s then you should switch to cold weather food.”

 

 

Regularly Check Pond Water Temperature

Feeding Pond Fish in Fall

Feeding Pond Fish in Fall

Begin checking your pond’s water temperature beginning in early fall.

When pond water gets below 59 degrees, you can — and should — plump up your koi darlings to survive winter hibernation. Using fish food made for cold water, gradually increase how much you feed these lovely fish as temperatures start to drop.

As the water temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them. Once temperatures go below 55 degrees, says Dave Kelly, from Aquascape inc., the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. 

And when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

So even though there is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely.

 

 

Aquatic Plants Maintenance

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

 

“Fall is also a good time to trim back and remove any dead foliage from your pond’s aquatic plants this time of year,” says Dave Stockwell. “This helps remove excessive organic material that would otherwise decompose in the water feature. Such decaying material can cause excess gasses and undesirable algae.”

Pond lilies, for example, which are idyllic water plants, tend to need a little maintenance in fall. It’s a good idea to cut them back to just about the base of the plant; also trim back any marginal plants that might eventually droop over into the water.

 

 

 

Pond Fish in Fall:

Pond Fish in Fall:

There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. Just a reminder, however. Once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely. 

Welcome to fall!

 

Landscape Planning: ‘Before’ and ‘After’ Projects (Part II)

As we promised in last week’s blog, today we’re sharing additional ‘Before’ and ‘After’ design/build projects. We hope they inspire your own backyard upgrade.

 

Pool and Retaining Wall Upgrade

“Before” (left) “After" (right)

“Before” (left) “After” (right)

These Dix Hills homeowners called on Deck and Patio when they decided to update their backyard pool area. Their old wood deck and red brick patios (above left) were small and unusable for parties and entertaining. They were looking for a complete plan to transform the space.

“We suggested a special idea to deal with the large wall behind the pool and small patio spaces,” says Dave Stockwell, owner of Deck and Patio. “The plan was to remove the wood retaining wall, re-grade the slope, and create a large natural waterfall, stream, and woodland garden (above right).”

Our design/build plan also called for draining the pool and removing the liner; a poorly built concrete block wall was uncovered and we straightened the wall and filled the block in with concrete and steal rebar for strength. New vinyl-covered stairs were added to the pool, plus new pipes, returns, skimmers, pump, filter and a new liner.

 

New Modern Deck

“Before” (left) “After" (right)

“Before/During Construction” (left) “After” (right)

These Centerport, NY, homeowners were both outdoor enthusiasts with a property that had a nice water view. Their wish list included: an attractive modern-looking deck from where they could best appreciate their view; a deck/railing that did not in any way obstruct the view; and a conveniently placed portable spa.

It was clear a two-story deck was needed. But we realized that the deck also needed to be large enough to allow designated areas for grilling, dining, lounging and hot tubbing. Plus, the railing would need special consideration.

An important choice for this Trex Deck project was the steel cable railing by Feeney does not obstruct the water views from any place on the deck. Deck and Patio built a custom spa “cradle” as a mount for their new hot tub. This positioned the spa so they could enjoy the views when inside the tub

 

New Backyard ‘Spool’

“Before” (left) “After" (right)

“Before” (left) “After” (right)

Deck and Patio built this backyard ‘spool” (a cross between a spa and pool) several years ago. The homeowners decided on a ‘spool” for their yard  because they didn’t have room for a full-sized pool.

A spool would also allow them to enjoy it year-round. They could opt to run cool water in it during warm months, and hot water during cold months and cool evenings.

In addition, the mechanics of a spa provides the benefits of hydrotherapy massage — not to mention the amazing experience of sitting under flowing water from an added waterfall. A new fence was added for contrast and a bit of drama; a rushing stream flows through the large moss rock boulders to become a waterfall flowing into the spa. Lush plantings and a new patio completed their new backyard retreat.

So let it blast cold — or even snow. With a backyard ‘spool’ you can stay indoors or even go out and still be warm.

 

 

Landscape Planning: ‘Before’ and ‘After’ Projects (Part I)

Fall and winter on Long Island are great seasons to not just plan, but to design/build that backyard upgrade you’ve been wanting.

And the first step is to look over one’s own yard. As you do this, you might enjoy checking out some ‘before’ and ‘after’ Deck and Patio projects. Today’s blog is Part I of a two-part series on ‘before and after’ Deck and Patio projects.

 

Before (left) & After (right)

Before (left) & After (right)

 

“The above project was for a Massapequa couple,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell, “who longed to enjoy their backyard more  — which was tidy but not enticing as well as being on the small side.”

So instead of opting for a more expensive pool, the couple decided on a quality hot tub, with a custom in-ground installation.

“An in-ground installation makes a portable hot tub appear like it’s a custom-made spa,” says Dave.  “Plus it would make it easier for them to get in and out of the spa.

However, even though they knew they’d love spending time outdoors in their new hot tub, they also wanted something beautiful to look at while in it. They certainly did not want to be facing their home’s siding, or even just a plain line of healthy evergreens. They decided on koi pond with waterfalls next to the hot tub.

Upshot? The pond with waterfalls, hot tub installation and landscaping were still less expensive than a pool. And they love going outdoors now.

 

Before (left) & After (right)

Before (left) & After (right)

 

After purchasing a new home, the homeowner contacted us because the entrance he had to drive over each day, on his way to and from work, had not been kept up for many years.

He asked us to accentuate the property’s beautiful 1880 bridge structure with a man-made reflecting pond.

Our design allowed the pre-existing bridge’s entire stone gazebo to be reflected in the pond water. The water feature we designed and built is more than 240-feet-long and 60-feet-wide, so it also captures the surrounding landscape. Plus, such a wonderful expanse of water made the perfect habitat for koi. 

Our team ensured the pond design included lots of flowing water, with rock overhangs, and plenty of space for pond fish to hide and thrive. Such a design makes it difficult for natural predators to reach the fish.

The stone bridge with turret creates a stunning pond reflection in its crystal clear water, doesn’t it?

 

We will have three more stunning projects next week. Watch this space!

 

 

Tips for Fattening Up Your Pond Fish in Fall

Last week our blog highlighted the need for putting netting over your pond before foliage begins to fall from the trees. Early fall is also a good time to begin fattening up your beautiful pond fish before the cold weather sets in.

 

Pond Fish in Fall

Pond Fish in Fall

Feeding Koi in Fall/Monitoring Pond Water

1.  At 59 degrees: In order to survive their winter hibernation, it is key to plump up your darlings once the pond water gets below 59 degrees. It is recommended that you feed them fish food made for cold water — and gradually increase how much you feed them.

2.  At 55 degrees: Then, as the water temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them. Experts say, once temperatures go below 55 degrees, the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. 

3.  At 50 degrees: And, finally, when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

So even though there is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely.

 

 

Koi Do Fine Outdoors in Winter/Photo: Aquascape, Inc

Koi Do Fine Outdoors in Winter/Photo: Aquascape, Inc

Pond Fish Will Be Fine As Temperatures Drop

“Many believe you can’t leave your pond fish outside once the cold sets in,” says Dave Stockwell. “But, actually, they do just fine even during winter.”

That said, Dave does caution pond owners to be alert. When ice covers the pond, the fish might not be getting enough oxygen.

This can be remedied as long as you give them:

  • two feet of water to swim in,
  • oxygenate the water
  • and keep a hole in the ice with a heater, bubbler and an aerator.

 

 

Unwanted Pond Debris Photo/Aquascape, Inc.

Unwanted Pond Debris Photo/Aquascape, Inc.

 

 

Pond Chemical Treatments

Note: This is also the perfect time to treat your pond ahead of the cold weather. The fact is, even if you netted your pond, some debris will make it into the water no matter how careful you are.

Cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria, works well below 50 degrees (F). It is wise to add it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.

 

 

 

 

Healthy Pond Come Spring

Healthy Pond Come Spring

Do a little pond maintenance (see last week’s blog) and care for your pond fish, and when spring arrives, you’ll be glad you did. Your pond will require much less work to begin your new season of pond-side outdoor living. This Deck and Patio pond (and the one captured in our feature photo at top of page) are good examples of healthy koi and well-maintained water features.

 

If you have any questions or would like assistance with preparing your pond or caring for your fish, contact our office at 631-549-8100.

 

By |2021-10-07T12:37:06-05:00October 7th, 2021|Aquascape Biofalls, Backyard Escapes, Koi Ponds, Landscaping, Living Landscapes, outdoor maintenance, Plantings/Pondscapes, Plants, Ponds & Water Features, Seasonal Landscapes, Streams, trees|Comments Off on Tips for Fattening Up Your Pond Fish in Fall

Pond Netting: Because Leaves Don’t Fall Far From the Tree

Fallen Leaves Affect Pond Ecosystems

Fallen Leaves Affect Pond Ecosystems

Usually around the middle of October Long Island experiences peak fall foliage. And, as those who have deciduous trees nearby know, those colorful leaves eventually land somewhere not far from the trees.

For some, falling leaves might only require raking or blowing. But those who have a pond or water feature know the leaves left in the water can mean one messy clean up come spring.

 

 

 

Value of Pond Netting: (Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape, Inc.)

Value of Pond Netting: (Photo: Courtesy of Aquascape, Inc.)

 

Don’t worry that netting will ruin enjoyment of your pond. Granted, netting is not the most beautiful addition.

 

“However, it isn’t up that long. Just get it up before the leaves fall and then simply pull it out once they’ve all dropped,” says Dave. “Just be sure to tent the netting so that it doesn’t sag into the pond water when it’s weighted with leaves.”

 

 

Dave adds that if you are late in putting up the netting, you can always use a long-handle pond net to clear out the debris. It’s just much easier if you use a net.

Another good idea is to trim back and remove any dead foliage from the aquatic plants before or after you put up the netting. “This cuts down excessive organic material that might otherwise decompose in the water feature,” says Dave.

 

Caring for Pond Lilies in Fall:

Caring for Pond Lilies in Fall:

One of the plants that requires trimming is the pond lily. They are idyllic water plants but unless it is cut back to just about its base, it might droop over into the water. This is true of any other marginal plants you have around the edges of your pond.

 

Treating Unwanted Pond Debris: (Photo: Aquascape, Inc.)

Treating Unwanted Pond Debris: (Photo: Aquascape, Inc.)

 

 

Since some debris will make it into your pond no matter how hard you work, Aquascape Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).  Their expert, Dave Kelly, recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.

There may be a little work involved, but the joys of autumn are well worth it. Fall foliage viewing, apple picking, and evenings beside fire pits while the kids roast marshmallows — all working up to the big day: Halloween — is a very small effort to pay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

By |2021-09-30T14:14:18-05:00September 30th, 2021|Backyard Refurbishments, Koi Ponds, Landscaping, outdoor maintenance, Plantings/Pondscapes, Plants, Ponds & Water Features, Seasonal Landscapes, Streams, Updating Landscape|Comments Off on Pond Netting: Because Leaves Don’t Fall Far From the Tree

It’s Pond Maintenance Time in Long Island, NY

Pond Netting

Pond Netting

We’re nearing peak foliage in most parts of Long Island. And that lovely sight reminds us it’s time to do some pond maintenance.

In a previous blog, we reminded water feature lovers to put a net over them before the leaves begin to fall. 

Once all the leaves have dropped and been captured by the net, you can simply pull it out and once again enjoy your pond unobstructed.

Note: If netting isn’t your thing, a long-handle pond net allows you to scoop down to the bottom and pull out leaves and other debris. It’s a bit more work, but effective. 

Also, since ponds tend to lose significant water by evaporation during the summer, clearing out debris keeps the pond from getting too shallow and needing extra water to keep it topped off and healthy. 

 

Aquatic Plants Maintenance

Deck and Patio Ponds

Deck and Patio Ponds

“It’s a good idea to trim back and remove any dead foliage from aquatic plants this time of year,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell. “This helps remove excessive organic material that would otherwise decompose in the water feature. Such decaying material can cause excess gasses and undesirable algae.”

Pond lilies, for example, which are idyllic water plants, tend to need a little maintenance in fall. It’s a good idea to cut them back to just about the base of the plant; also trim back any marginal plants that might eventually droop over into the water.

 

 

Chemical Pond Treatments

 Leaves In Backyard Stream

Leaves In Backyard Stream

 

Some debris will make it into your pond no matter how careful you are.

Dave Kelly of renounced pond experts Aquasacpe Inc. recommends adding a cold water bacteria treatment, which has concentrated strains of beneficial bacteria that works well below 50 degrees (F).

Kelly recommends adding it routinely to help maintain water clarity and quality.  Photo: Aquascape Inc.

 

 

 

 

Caring for Pond Fish

You can — and should — plump up your koi darlings to survive winter hibernation. As temperatures start to drop, gradually increase how much you feed them. When your pond’s water gets below 59 degrees, we recommend using fish food made for cold water. 

Note: As the temperature continues to drop, gradually reduce the amount you feed them.   Once water temperatures go below 55 degrees, says Kelly, the metabolisms of pond fish slow way down. And when pond water gets down to 50 degrees, do not feed the fish any more. Their systems shut down in the colder water, and food sits inside them and rots. They get very sick and diseased from this.

Pond Fish in Fall: There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. However, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely.

Pond Fish in Fall:
There is nothing cuter than your koi coming to you for more food. However, once the water gets to 50 degrees, experts say stop feeding them entirely.

 

There! That’s not so bad, is it. Just remember: a little fall maintenance makes all the difference.

 

Healthy Ponds: Once Spring arrives, and your pond and fish are healthy and thriving, you’ll be glad you took such good care of your pond in the Fall. There! That’s not so bad, is it. Just remember: a little fall maintenance makes all the difference.

Healthy Ponds:
Once Spring arrives, and your pond and fish are healthy and thriving, you’ll be glad you took such good care of your pond in the Fall.

 

If you have questions, or need assistance, give our office a call at 631-549-8100.

 

Budget Backyard Upgrade: ‘Hot Tub with a View’

When a Massapequa, NY, couple contacted our office a while back. they were looking for a change to their yard. They felt what they had wasn’t too enticing. 

“Given the size of their property as well as their budget, a pool was out of the question,” says Deck and Patio’s Dave Stockwell. “So we suggested that a budget-friendly quality portable hot tub, set in the ground could appear like a stylish custom built spa.”

However, even though the couple knew they’d love spending time outdoors in such a hot tub, they also wanted something special to look at while in it. They certainly did not want to be facing their home’s siding, or even just a plain line of healthy evergreens. 

Most people enjoy some sort of water feature with moving water. So Deck and Patio suggested a small pond with waterfalls next to the spa.

“When we mentioned it, we learned the husband had longed for a pond for some time,” says Dave. “And by adding one as part of a single overall project with the spa, it would save time and money, and allow the same designer to plan it all in a harmonious way.”

 

Massapequa, NY, Before Photo

Massapequa, NY, Before Photo

Here is the Massapequa, NY backyard before we added a spa and pond. You can see that the yard was on the small side with not too many existing options that could act as focal points for outdoor enjoyment. 

 

The Spa

 

Massapequa Project/Spa Installation:

Massapequa Project/Spa Installation:

By customizing the installation of a portable spa, putting it in-ground, made the hot tub itself appear like it was a custom-made spa.  Plus it’s easy to get in and out of.

“Deck and Patio is a local distributor for portable CAL Spas, which can be installed in-ground like this one,” says Deck and Patio’s Parker Lippolt. 

“Our CAL Spas also offer customizable therapy options with adjustable water jets, which are great benefits. With three different series — each with a selection of models — there’s enough choices, including swim spas, to fit just about anyone’s need.”

 

Portable Hot Tubs (Massapequa/NY):

Portable Hot Tubs (Massapequa/NY):

“Portable spas are self-contained units, with all they need to operate included within itself. Which is what helps make them so cost-friendly compared to other water features,” adds Dave.

That said, when installing them in-ground, it must be done in a way that allows water from rain to drain away from the spa. If not, the hot tub’s plumbing could get damaged. 

“In this case, in order to have it completely in-ground, we removed the spa’s plumbing equipment to a protected area above ground where it is accessible for any future repairs.”

 

The Pond

 

Pond and Spa (Massapequa/NY):

Pond and Spa (Massapequa/NY):

When the clients sit outside now they enjoy the sound of water as well as see a lovely pond with waterfalls. And they get to watch the pond fish swim about. Not only do they have this view from their patio, but even better, they can enjoy it all — and even feed the koi — from their in-ground spa. 

 

Pond With Waterfall

Pond With Waterfall

The project’s natural-looking pond with a waterfall feature included surrounding moss rock boulders and lush landscaping. We used Aquascape Inc.’s water systems — high efficiency pumps, skimmers, biological filters etc. 

“The couple told us that their ‘in-tub views’ are spectacular,” says Dave. “Plus the in-ground installation makes it easy to get in and out of the spa. They also said they love the spa’s hydrotherapy for all kinds of relief as well as relaxation. 

“It was definitely the right choice for them.”

 

Backyard Ponds Offer Multi-Seasonal Enjoyment

Children Love Ponds

Children Love Ponds

It’s pretty well accepted that a child fortunate enough to grow up exploring nature will never lose his/her love for the outdoors.

Even when the weather is chilly, kids and adults alike enjoy studying what’s happening in a pond. And when winter comes, and the koi hibernate, a backyard pond can be great to skate on or stroll alongside on a winter walk.

“Not everyone lives near a large park with streams, or a pond, abundant with flora and fauna, however” says our own Dave Stockwell. “And not every parent is comfortable with letting children stray too far away from home in order to experience this.”

For many Deck and Patio clients (over 300 and counting) the answer has been adding a wildlife refuge (small wildlife that is) on one’s own property.

Ponds in Summer

Ponds in Summer

When a backyard pond with waterfalls is well done, its features can attract lots of interesting and friendly creatures that children love: birds, frogs, salamanders, butterflies.

And, of course, by adding koi and lovely aquatic plants, children and adults can be entertained as well as educated for hours at a time.

Snorkeling at Home in Summer

COVID has kept so many from traveling. Some of those stuck at home miss such vacation delights as snorkeling and seeing the colorful fish of the the Caribbean and elsewhere. But did you know, with your own pond, if it’s built deep enough, you can enjoy that right in your own yard, too. So it’s definitely not just the kids who find endless ways to enjoy the pond in summer.

To give you an idea of the pond experience, here’s a video showing a Cold Spring Harbor, NY, pond that Deck and Patio designed/built. The video captures what’s going on both at ground level and under the pond water.

 

 

Ice Skating at Home in Winter

Multi-Seasonal Construction

Multi-Seasonal Construction

While most water features, particularly ponds, are enjoyed extensively in warm weather, a water feature is actually appreciated during all seasons. And they can even be built during winter’s blasts.

But why not wait for spring to build a pond? 

“You’d be surprised what can be built outdoors during the cold months,” adds Dave. Click here for a Deck and Patio water feature built primarily during winter.

Pond Skating

Pond Skating

Once the pond it built, it takes some prep work and lots of caution and care to make a rink, but according to nationally-recognized “The Pond Guy,” you can turn your pond into a rink for skating.

The Pond Guy has several blogs on this topic covering how to create good ice, what red flags to look for, how to check the ice, and how to create a glassy smooth surface. For two of his blogs, click here and here. 

“Or you can just give us a call and we’ll help you through this process,” says Dave.

 

How About Autumn and Spring?

We’ll be posting on the joys of ponds in spring and autumn soon.

Watch this space. 

 

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